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Links 1 through 10 of 40 by Atif Aziz tagged architecture

“I'm certainly not the first person to notice this, but the problem with MVC as given is that you end up stuffing too much code into your controllers, because you don't know where else to put it.

To fix this I've been using a new pattern: MOVE. Models, Operations, Views, and Events.”

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“This first of a two-part series discusses how messaging patterns exist at different levels of abstraction in SOA. Rather than explicitly declaring how systems will interact through low-level protocols and object-oriented architectures, SOA provides an abstract interface through which a service can interact with other services or applications through a loosely coupled (often asynchronous), message-based communication model. ”

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“Architects look at thousands of buildings during their training, and study critiques of those buildings written by masters. In contrast, most software developers only ever get to know a handful of large programs well—usually programs they wrote themselves—and never study the great programs of history. As a result, they repeat one another's mistakes rather than building on one another's successes.
This book's goal is to change that. In it, the authors of twenty-five open source applications explain how their software is structured, and why. What are each program's major components? How do they interact? And what did their builders learn during their development? In answering these questions, the contributors to this book provide unique insights into how they think.”

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Kris Zyp compares how REST principles can be applied to or seen in everyday programming.

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Online way to make sequence diagrams in UML from a text description.

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The "Linked Data" meme is about enhancing the Web by unobtrusively reintroducing its core essence: the generic HTTP URI, a vital piece of Web Architecture DNA. Basically, its about so realizing the full capabilities of the Web as a platform for Open Data Identification, Definition, Access, Storage, Representation, Presentation, and Integration.

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A Is for Advocate, B Is for Balance, C Is for Coach, D Is for Dependencies, E Is for Evangelist, F Is for Frameworks, G Is for Governance, H Is for Human Dynamics, I Is for Innovation, J Is for Judgment, K Is for Knowledge, L Is for Leadership, M Is for Modeling, N Is for "N-tier", O Is for Object Orientation, P Is for Patterns, Q Is for Quality, R Is for Road Maps, S Is for Strategy, T Is for Thinking, U Is for Understanding, V Is for Values, W Is for Whiteboard, X Is for XML, Y Is for YAGNI, Z Is for Zeitgeist

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For many that come briefly into contact with Extreme Programming, it seems that XP calls for the death of software design. Not just is much design activity ridiculed as "Big Up Front Design", but such design techniques as the UML, flexible frameworks, and even patterns are de-emphasized or downright ignored. In fact XP involves a lot of design, but does it in a different way than established software processes. XP has rejuvenated the notion of evolutionary design with practices that allow evolution to become a viable design strategy. It also provides new challenges and skills as designers need to learn how to do a simple design, how to use refactoring to keep a design clean, and how to use patterns in an evolutionary style.

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Steve Venoski on RPC: “[Developers] have a general-purpose imperative programming-language hammer, so [they] treat distributed computing as just another nail to bend to fit the programming models.”

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This paper attempts to objectify the WS-* vs. REST debate by giving a technical comparison based on architectural principles and decisions, showing that the two differ in the number of architectural decisions that must be made and available alternatives.

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