Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 137 by Paul Raven tagged industry

"With the tools in place, the second part of this new industrial age is how manufacturing has been opened up to individuals, letting them scale prototypes into full production runs. Over the past few years, Chinese manufacturers have evolved to handle small orders more efficiently. This means that one-person enterprises can get things made in a factory the way only big companies could before.

Two trends are driving this. First, there’s the maturation and increasing Web-centrism of business practices in China. Now that the Web generation is entering management, Chinese factories increasingly take orders online, communicate with customers by email, and accept payment by credit card or PayPal, a consumer-friendly alternative to traditional bank transfers, letters of credit, and purchase orders. Plus, the current economic crisis has driven companies to seek higher-margin custom orders to mitigate the deflationary spiral of commodity goods." Chris Anderson.

Share It With Others!

"The term ‘music industry’ is a misnomer. In reality the ‘music industry’ is not one industry, it is several independent industries. This is an important distinction because if we say that there is a “crisis in the music industry” it suggests an equal amount of misfortune for everyone (musicians, the recording industry, the live-music industry, Internet radio, etc.) and in fact this not true. Misuse of the term ‘music industry’ distorts the reality of the situation."

Share It With Others!

"Not surprisingly, it found that retail product sales have declined, but the other parts of the industry have grown noticeably more than the decline in retail sales. This growth has come from a few sources. Live show attendance has increased more than retail sales have decreased. Consumers have actually spent more. On top of that, the business to business side of the industry (sponsorships, licensing, advertisements, etc.) has grown as well, opening up new and lucrative means of making money. " YA RLY.

Share It With Others!

"Wholesale copying of music on P2P networks is fair use. Statutory damages can't be applied to P2P users. File-swapping results in no provable harm to rightsholders.

These are just some of the assertions that Harvard Law professor Charles Nesson made last week in his defense of accused file-swapper Joel Tenenbaum. In court filings, Nesson spelled out his defense strategy, which doesn't appear to involve claims that his client "didn't do it." Instead, Nesson argues that it doesn't matter if Tenenbaum copied music; such noncommercial uses are presumptively "fair" and anyone seeking to squeeze file-swappers for statutory damages is entitled to precisely zero dollars." Zing!

Share It With Others!

"New acts see value in giving away their music. And if you control it, you’ve got the right. How long until there’s enough unfettered new music, tunes the creators control as opposed to the fat cats, that someone from the outside can roll up these rights and create a viable alternative to the established game?"

Share It With Others!

"So now the pitch goes: "We gave you what you asked for, you've brought us to our knees. Now, please stop ripping us off and start buying music again – we're offering a fair deal." But anyone who examines the pitch closely can see it for what it really is: just more bait for yet another trap. It's that pesky user-agreement. When you go into one of the few remaining record stores, there's no clerk beside the till chanting, "By buying this music, you agree to the following terms and conditions," rattling off an inexhaustible set of rights that you're surrendering for having the temerity to buy your music instead of ripping it off." Doctorow.

Share It With Others!

"Dongxiaokou, on the outskirts of Beijing, is a village composed of scrap: blocks of crushed metal are stacked in a tower, heaps of plastic bottles glint in the sunshine and piles of newspapers and rags fill yards. But the merchants all have the same story - they have lost tens of thousands of pounds in a few months, wiping out years of hard work."

Share It With Others!

"I don’t want to get into the economics of the Long Tail, but Seth Godin said something that I agree with. “Everything is available.” That doesn’t mean everything’s going to sell in quantity. You have to match your marketing relative to your expectations, so if you’re expecting to be mass and you’re micro and you spend according to mass, you’re screwed, but yes, there is a marketplace. Everything can be purchased."

Share It With Others!

"Even if all prices were lowered to $5, the other factors would remain unchanged. There would be no more promotion. There would be no more awareness. Any spike in attention generated by a lower price point would drop and level off as consumers adjusted to the permanent price change. There will be individual cases that get increased promotion and awareness -- it happens all the time -- but on a macro level none of this will change."

Share It With Others!

"This second and final installment concerns the business environment in which science fiction writers work, with particular attention to two aspects of it: the widely perceived decline of the magazines that have traditionally been regarded as the genre’s standard-bearers; and the state of book publishing today."

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT