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Links 1 through 10 of 63 by Amy Gahran tagged energy

"the document that will be the reference point for this energy education revolution (hey, sometimes revolutions start out in very boring ways). While a dozen-page document might sound like something you could punch out in a couple of weeks, the idea is to draw feedback from across the various interested groups and create something that can be used as a single reference point. The project, led by Matthew Inman, an Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow with the DOE (who is the embodiment of your favorite high school teacher), will use a wiki to draw feedback from interested parties over the next few months, and will hopefully deliver the first version of the document by the summer, 2011"

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"The chairman and CEO of General Electric Co. branded U.S. energy policy a failure in remarks to a smart grid conference yesterday, saying that other nations, led by China, are speeding past the United States in developing the next generation of energy technologies.

"It's just stupid what we have here today," said Jeffrey Immelt, who heads the largest U.S. new energy technology company, speaking to the GridWise Global Forum in Washington. "Energy is one of the places I worry about most," he added. "The rest of the world is moving 10 times faster than we are. The United States will remain an underdog in clean energy competition unless Congress can get past its partisan deadlock and produce effective national energy policies, he said."

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"the real culprit is that battery technology and capacity have not evolved as rapidly as the power and functionality in Smartphone’s like the Incredible. I will add one caveat: HTC, for whatever reason, decided to deviate from their other recent smartphone offerings that standardized on form factor and a rating of 1500mAh capacity. I can't explain why they chose to downgrade the Incredible battery to 1300mAh, when the 1500mAh battery fits perfectly and provides an increase of 200mAh."

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Audio podcast

"Vice President Joe Biden is in Midland, Michigan today. He’s there for the groundbreaking of a new plant that will make advanced batteries for electric and hybrid cars. Michigan’s governor, Jennifer Granholm, says she wants Michigan to be the battery capital of the nation and guide a revival of the state’s economy and the automotive industry. It’s a nice idea, Michigan getting back on its feet finding a growth industry, but what needs to happen for it to work?"

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"The United States entered the hydrocarbon era with one of the world’s largest pools of oil and natural gas. The exploitation of these valuable and versatile commodities has long contributed to the nation’s wealth and power, as well as to the profitability of giant energy firms like BP and Exxon. In the process, however, most of our easily accessible onshore oil and gas reservoirs have been depleted, leaving only less accessible reserves in offshore areas, Alaska, and the melting Arctic. To ensure a continued supply of hydrocarbons -- and the continued prosperity of the giant energy companies -- successive administrations have promoted the exploitation of these extreme energy options with a striking disregard for the resulting dangers. By their very nature, such efforts involve an ever increasing risk of human and environmental catastrophe -- something that has been far too little acknowledged."

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"We've entered an age in which the production of energy, especially from fossil fuels, demands ever-more-expensive environmental trade-offs. We've entered what Michael Klare, professor at Hampshire College, calls the era of "extreme energy."

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Audio podcast. Intriguing energy-related resource, map-based:

"Andre Parris is the global manager for energy and commodity trading at Bloomberg, the financial news publishing conglomerate. Parris is responsible for developing the BMAP application, a business and location intelligence dashboard that displays a plethora of location-based information related to energy commodities. In this interview with Directions Media's editor in chief, Joe Francica, Parris explains how the application was developed and the types of analyses that can be performed by commodity traders to get the latest, real-time information about various factors that might impact commodity prices from around the world."

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"Utilities across the country are announcing plans to develop tens or hundreds of megawatts of solar generating capacity in partnership with building owners. It has the markings of a national trend that could be very good for the solar industry -- and for companies with certain kinds of commercial real estate."

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"The iPhone uses more power saving features than previous smartphone designs. Most devices that use data do so in short bursts. Normally, devices that access the data network use an idling state that maintains the open data channel between the device and the network. However, to squeeze even more battery life from the iPhone, Apple configured the radio to simply drop the data connection as soon as any requested data is received. When the iPhone needs more data, it has to set up a new data connection.

"The result is more efficient use of the battery, but it can cause problems with the signaling channels used to set up connections between a device and a cell node. Cell nodes use signaling channels to set up the data connection, as well as signaling phone calls, SMS messages, voicemails, and more. When enough iPhones are in a particular area, these signaling channels can become overloaded—there simply aren't enough to handle all the data requests along with all the calls and messages.

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