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Links 1 through 10 of 15 by Suw Charman-Anderson tagged wired

Kevin: As the New York Times launches itself on Flipboard and looks to expand its paid content offering beyond its own properties, Wired and The New Yorker are pulling back from Flipboard. A VP from Wired said that they wanted people to interact with Wired content on Wired.com and "not through an intermediary".

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Kevin: In its first month, Wired magazine's iPad sales outpaced print. It was somehow shown as a vindication of a their strategy. I thought it was really an outlier. You can generalise behaviour from Wired's very tech lusty audience to the general population. They are early adopters. They will buy things just to try them. The real question was what would happen after the initial blush. Now we know, sales are a quarter of what they were the first month. We'll need more data before we have a sense of sustainable numbers.

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Kevin: My former colleague Jack Schofield interrogates the numbers behind Wired's proclamation that "the web is dead". Like a lot of pieces, Wired's headline bleeds out the nuance in the piece itself. Jack also points out problems of comparing video to text content in terms of the size of the files. It's a good piece from someone with a lot of knowledge both in terms of technology and journalism.

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Kevin: Wired's iPad app will see a price cut for its second issue, from $4.99 to $3.99. The first issue was seen as a huge success, selling 95,000 copies, despite a lot of criticism about how it looks, works and how large it is (weighing in at 500MB) Chris Anderson, the editor of Wired and the author of Free, said that he prefers a freemium model where some parts of the magazine would be free with premium elements that people could buy. However, as Peter Kafka takes pains to highlight, Anderson has no control over pricing.

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Kevin: Another insightful and critical article looking at iPad 'app' design. I'd have to agree that the first generation of magazine apps is little more than multimedia brochure-ware. It really is as many predicted a throw-back to the CD-ROM era of the early 1990s. I still am completely amazed that Wired charges you $5 for a deck of image files. The articles aren't text but images of pages. It's a ridiculous retrograde step, and frankly, I think the market will punish them, as well it should. The print fundamentalists are hijacking digital. They might make some money in the short term, but it will be a brief victory.

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Kevin: A gem from 1994 by Jon Katz, that's right 1994. Katz wrote: "Over the past decade, newspapers have made almost every kind of radical move except transforming themselves. It's as if they've considered every possible option but the most urgent - change." Nope. We never saw the current problems coming. You keep believing that if it makes you feel better.

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Kevin: As an up and coming internet commentator, are you Dave Winer, Mark Cuban, Michael Arrington, Seth Goden, Chris Anderson, Nichalas Carr or Jeff Jarvis? Use this simple flowchart to determine "Which Blowhard am I?"

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Suw: Fascinating piece about how tools like Xobni can help us discover our emailing habits, and how that can help us use email better.

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Suw: Chris Anderson pulls no punches, and publishes a list of the email addresses flacks have used to send him inappropriate press releases. Flacks *must* learn to be more careful. Especially, it seems, people from Weber Shandwick and Edelman.

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Suw: "Insecurity is the norm. If any system -- whether a voting machine, operating system, database, badge-entry system, RFID passport system, etc. -- is ever built completely vulnerability-free, it'll be the first time in the history of mankind."

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