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Links 1 through 10 of 11 by Suw Charman-Anderson tagged fail

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Kevin: Succinct but very useful post on the problem with magazine iPad apps. They are too big, and the resolution is poor. It will look very poor on the iPad 3.

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Kevin: It looks like the collapse of MySpace is nearly complete. The international staff is being let go ahead of a sale. The Murdoch touch still doesn't work in the internet. Yet another failed News Corp internet strategy.

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Kevin: The Columbus Dispatch took the original video of a homeless man with a golden voice. The video was uploaded to YouTube where it became a viral sensation, and the homeless man a cause celebre. He now is being courted for voice contracts. The Dispatch sought a take-down notice for the video from YouTube. Cory Berman on Lost Remote writes: "For stories that take on a life of their own, the benefit of massive distribution — even if you don’t control it — outweighs the value of walling it off on your own site. Pulling the clip is like a slap in the face to the community that helped make the story explode."

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Kevin: From Jon Fildes at the BBC: "Google has admitted to BBC News that testing of its controversial social network Buzz was insufficient.

The firm has had to make a series of changes to the service after a ferocious backlash from users concerned about intrusions of privacy."

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Kevin: This was my read of the whole AP 'DRM' debacle. The hNews microformat allows them to track the news, but it won't 'protect' their content. As Ryan Singel points out: "As a means of improving indexing and search, this approach works just fine. As a shield against unauthorized use of content, however, it is easily thwarted. Indeed, it is designed to detect unauthorized use under conditions a content thief would be unlikely to use: Simply cutting and pasting AP content will remove all underlying code (as an overly ambitious aggregator might). So will re-typing it (as a commenting blogger might)." They would probably better publishing all of their content as PDFs if they really want to lock down their content

What's really sad is that the AP has shown how technically ignorant it is on so many levels with this episode. hNews doesn't provide a 'container' for news, and they can't explain how it 'protects' content because it doesn't.

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Kevin: The criticicism of the Associated Press continues to roll in. Scott Rosenberg writes: "“A.P. Cracks Down on Unpaid Use of Articles on Web.” That’s the headline on a New York Times article right now. But if you read the article, you see that the Associated Press’s new campaign isn’t only about “unpaid use of articles,” it’s about any use of headlines as links. In other words, it sounds like A.P. is pulling the pin on a legal Doomsday Machine for news and information on the Web — claiming that there is no fair use right to link to articles using a brief snippet of verbiage from that article, or the original headline on the article."

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Kevin: My colleague Martin Belam writes about how the media in the UK are burying their own bad news. It's a post well worth reading. Martin writes: "With the impact of digital distribution, and the effect of the economic downturn, we have more than enough reasons to think that the news industry is dying. Treating our remaining paying customers like children who haven't learnt to use Google yet makes us look like we have a collective death wish."

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Kevin: A PR social media expert at Ketchum makes unflattering remarks about the Memphis, key hub for large client FedEx, on Twitter. The company gets slapped.

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"Online?!? This is going to be printed in the newspaper. I'm a proper news journalist," says Adam Smith of the Birmingham Mail. He may just be cutting and pasting from the BBC News website, by his own admission, but he claims to have wrapped his class cut and paste job in "some award-winning prose". Tip of the hat to Adam Tinworth for this truly shocking bit of video.

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