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Links 1 through 10 of 24 by Suw Charman-Anderson tagged Washingtonpost

Kevin: paidContent has a useful and interesting look at how different sites are managing the crowdsourcing project surrounding the release of tens of thousands of Sarah Palin's emails from when she was governor of Alaska. 

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Kevin: Interesting write up on personalised aggregator Ongo that the NYTimes, Washington Post and Gannett have ploughed $12m into. What's interesting is that this ship might have left the dock with services like Flipboard, Feedly and Zite. Even if RSS is 'super-advanced', which I don't believe it is, I'm not sure that this fills a need better than other free options. In terms of RSS, I think it suffers a lack of awareness more than anything. Interesting write up by Rick Edmonds nonetheless.

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Kevin: A look at Ongo, a new paid aggregator launched by Alex Kazim, a former eBay executive. He has secured $12m in funding from The New York Times Co, the Washington Post and Gannett. It looks interesting, although some have dismissed it out of hand. It's one to watch.

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Kevin: "Now that Twitter has reached unprecedented popularity and usage, where is their revenue going to come from? Bob talks to Twitter co-founder Evan Williams about Twitter's new advertising model and the future of the communications platform."
In the interview, Ev talks about the engagement rate that the Washington Post received from sponsoring a trend for the 2010 US Midterms. The 9% 'engagement rate' is significantly higher than engagement with display advertising, which is often less than 1%.

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Kevin: The Washington Post bought #election for the 2010 Midterms. They purchased both a promoted hashtag and also the trending topic so that the trend was listed first by Twitter and their tweets were given prominence. Mathew Ingram reports that the Post paid $100,000. Was it successful? Twitter said it resulted in 9% 'engagement', which means that people clinked on a link, retweeted something or followed the Post's Twitter feed. It wasn't a big traffic driver. Twitter reported that this was in line with other promoted trends.

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Kevin: Steve Myers has a good round-up of the Washington Post's efforts to leverage the popularity of Twitter. The Post bought the trending topic "election" and the hashtag election for the US Midterms. This guaranteed them the top trending topic and a top spot on that trend. Myers said that this would allow the Post to rise above the din of coverage on election day. This was the first time a media organisation had used the promoted trend product from Twitter. If it proves successful, I'm sure that this is just the first time. Twitter might have an answer of how it will make money.

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Kevin: The dismal state of the finances at Newsweek and possible succession plans as the Washington Post Company finalises a sale. (It will be difficult, even for a billionaire to right this ship.)

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Kevin: There has been an ongoing discussion about the Washington Post's new social media policy, and it's stirred up a rather predicable discussion about objectivity and credibility, which I'm still rolling over in my head. However, I think that Michele McLellan at the Knight Digital Media Center who says the basic message to journalists is not to try social media. "The Washington Post’s new social media guidelines seem destined to send this message to the newsroom: Social media - Don’t go there."

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Kevin: Rafat Ali reports at paidContent: "as bigger portals continue to buy local sites (Patch, EveryBlock), newspapers continue to close them: latest example is Washington Post (NYSE: WPO), which is closing its only standalone local site LoudonExtra, two years after the hyperlocal site launched. The rationale from the company, as told to Loudoun Independent, by a WaPo spokesperson: 'We found that our experiment with LoudounExtra.com as a separate site was not a sustainable model.'"

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Kevin: Stowe Boyd weighs in on the discussion of the weekend, Ian Shapira of the Washington Post writing about how Gawker and how the "wild world" of the internet is killing journalism. Stowe says that most of the hand-wringing in traditional media "is completely off point".

" The real story is not about what is spent to write the stories, or how much ad revenue is derived by who. The really interesting economic shift is the millions of comments and twitterers and blog posts that are dealing with this controversy today, where no one is getting paid, or making money on ads, or getting a quarterly 401(k) statement."

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