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Links 1 through 10 of 1486 Schusterman Library at OU-Tulsa's Bookmarks

Increasing the minimum wage would have two principal effects on low-wage workers. Most of them would receive higher pay that would increase their family's income, and some of those families would see their income rise above the federal poverty threshold. But some jobs for low-wage workers would probably be eliminated, the income of most workers who became jobless would fall substantially, and the share of low-wage workers who were employed would probably fall slightly.

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By 2020, older workers age 55+ will account for 25% of the U.S. labor force, up from just 13% in 2000. This shift reflects two trends: the overall population is aging and more and more older people are working longer. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that by 2020, 28% of women age 65-74 will be working, up from 15% in 2000, and 35% of men age 65-74 will be working, up from 25% in 2000.

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Related Data Set for "Labor Force Growth Slows, Hispanic Share Grows." Hispanics will account for three-quarters of the growth in the nation's labor force from 2010 to 2020, according to new projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). One major reason is that the Hispanic population is growing rapidly due to births and immigration. At the same time, the aging of the non-Hispanic white population is expected to reduce their numbers in the labor force.

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Hispanics will account for three-quarters of the growth in the nation's labor force from 2010 to 2020, according to new projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). One major reason is that the Hispanic population is growing rapidly due to births and immigration. At the same time, the aging of the non-Hispanic white population is expected to reduce their numbers in the labor force.

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Table of data in coordination with "Charting the labor market: Data from the Current Population Survey (CPS)" The Bureau of Labor Statistics monthly data report on occupation, age, and gender reports from the Community Survey.

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The Bureau of Labor Statistics monthly data report on occupation, age, and gender reports from the Community Survey.

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Infographics version of "Statistical Portrait of Hispanics in the United States, 2011" This statistical profile of the Latino population is based on Hispanic Trends Project tabulations of the Census Bureau's 2011 American Community Survey (ACS). Users should exercise caution when comparing the 2011 estimates with estimates for previous years. Population estimates in the 2011 ACS are based on the latest information from the 2010 Decennial Census; the 2005 to 2009 ACS estimates are based on the latest information available for those surveys-updates of the 2000 Decennial Census. The impact of this discontinuity on comparisons between the 2010 and later ACS and earlier years is discussed in a recent report.

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This statistical profile of the Latino population is based on Hispanic Trends Project tabulations of the Census Bureau's 2011 American Community Survey (ACS). Users should exercise caution when comparing the 2011 estimates with estimates for previous years. Population estimates in the 2011 ACS are based on the latest information from the 2010 Decennial Census; the 2005 to 2009 ACS estimates are based on the latest information available for those surveys-updates of the 2000 Decennial Census. The impact of this discontinuity on comparisons between the 2010 and later ACS and earlier years is discussed in a recent report.

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The United States, the third most populous country globally, accounts for about 4.5% of the world's population. The U.S. population-currently estimated at 308.7 million persons-has more than doubled since its 1950 level of 152.3 million. More than just being double in size, the population has become qualitatively different from what it was in 1950. As noted by the Population Reference Bureau, "The U.S. is getting bigger, older, and more diverse." The objective of this report is to highlight some of the demographic changes that have already occurred since 1950 and to illustrate how these and future trends will reshape the nation in the decades to come (through 2050).

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