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Links 1 through 7 of 7 by piers young tagged law

Drawing examples from all over the Internet - including a certain iPhone app that you may have heard of - Zittrain raises some serious (and some seriously entertaining) questions about ethical and legal aspects of distributed human computing.

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A source close to the British Labour Government has just given me reliable information about the most radical copyright proposal I've ever seen.

Secretary of State Peter Mandelson is planning to introduce changes to the Digital Economy Bill now under debate in Parliament. These changes will give the Secretary of State (Mandelson -- or his successor in the next government) the power to make "secondary legislation" (legislation that is passed without debate) to amend the provisions of Copyright, Designs and Patents Act (1988).

What that means is that an unelected official would have the power to do anything without Parliamentary oversight or debate, provided it was done in the name of protecting copyright.

...

This proposal creates the office of Pirate-Finder General, with unlimited power to appoint militias who are above the law, who can pry into every corner of your life, who can disconnect you from your family, job, education and government, who can fine you or put you in jail.

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[via Foe] "If you’re observant, in central London, you may have seen this notice casually cable-tied to a lamppost. From afar, it looks like a council planning application, or parking bay suspension. It’s actually notifying you that you’re now subject to an anti-social behaviour order, and the Police (and the not-really-Police Community Support Officers) have special powers to remove you from this area if they feel like it. These dispersal areas cover large swathes of London, and other cities in England. There are now over 1000 such areas."

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# Some teachers use sites like MySpace to help connect, communicate with students
# Critics say the online communication breeds inappropriate relationships
# Proposed law would ban teachers from having online friendships with students
# Teacher says predators will get to children even if online friendships barred

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A judge in New York has ordered that Google, which owns YouTube, must pass on the details of more than 100 million people - many of them in the UK - to Viacom

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... but I'm most intersted in unlucky 13.

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