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Links 1 through 10 of 45 by piers young tagged children

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“Because kids haven’t been exposed to the bureaucracy of professional science, they’re a lot more open to trying things,” Wilson says. “In that way, I think kids are able to sometimes do better science than adults.”

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Following a series of high-profile cases involving young defendents, the question of the age of criminal responsibility in the UK has been raised.

Some child experts argue that children who commit offences needed to be treated differently from adult criminals.

In March, the UK government rejected plans to raise the age in England and Wales from 10, one of the youngest in Europe. In Scotland there are plans to raise the age from eight to 12.

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I was perusing Edward Snow's "Inside Bruegel: The Play of Images in Childrens Games" and impressed with his de-construction of the painting. As a big fan of document based instruction, I got thinking about how much students could learn from a close reading of the work. Link to painting.

After a search, I found that a group of Belgian students had researched and re-enacted Bruegel the Elder's "Children's Games" (1560) for a class project. I'm reposting it to inspire enterprising teachers and students to try their hand at a reenactment of this (or another work).

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Le programme de Serious Game 2025 ex machina est une production Tralalere r�alis�e avec le soutien de la Commission europ�enne et la participation du CNC, dans le cadre du programme Internet Sans Crainte / Safer Internet Program.

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CyberMentors is all about young people helping and supporting each other online.

If you're being bullied, or are feeling a bit low, or are maybe troubled by something and you're not sure what to do or who to talk to, then CyberMentors is where you can go for help. It doesn't matter how big or small you think the problem is, or whether you're being targeted online or offline, CyberMentors are here to listen and support you.

The best thing about it is that CyberMentors are young people too. It's never easy talking about bullying, and many young people have told us that they would prefer to speak to another young person if they could. That's why CyberMentors are young people like you, who have been trained and are volunteering their time online to help you. It's still important however, that you talk to your parents or teachers if you can.

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The DKP system is an entirely self-enforcing mechanism; yet its effectiveness among gamers who adopt it runs at close to 100%. This is because it works; because it is transparent and meticulously fair; and because it has been laboriously calibrated over time to prevent collusive bidding or other kinds of cheating.

Neither playing Warcraft nor building a virtual polling booth in Second Life is likely to win many votes for a British political party in 2010, of course. And spending 24 hours a day in either environment is unlikely to do much for anyone's conversational abilities. But it's high time we began to understand games on their own terms, with all the potentials and dangers that entails: as arguably the most powerful models we have for connecting and motivating, and understanding those vast, disparate groups of people a digital age throws together.

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Based on a year long ethnographic study in Toronto, Canada, this paper looks at how - contrary to many mainstream accounts - younger users do indeed care about protecting and controlling their personal information. However, their concerns revolve around what I call social privacy, rather than the more conventional institutional privacy. This paper also examines the somewhat subversive practices which users engaged in to enhance their own social privacy, and in some cases, violate that of others.

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"Kids have always cared about privacy, it's just that their notions of privacy look very different than adult notions," she says. "Kids don't have the kind of privacy that we assume they do."

"As adults, by and large, we think of the home as a very private space – it's private because we have control over it. The thing is, for young people it's not a private space – they have no control. They have no control over who comes in and out of their room, or who comes in and out of their house. As a result the online world feels more private because it feels like it has more control."

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Mizuko Ito, trained as an anthropologist, has spent more than a decade hanging out with, interacting with, and observing young people who are engaging new media in their own ways - from her early observations of the ways young girls in Tokyo were appropriating pagers and mobile short-messaging for their own social purposes, to her most recent ethnographic study of youth media practices. In this, the first of three parts, she talks about what parents, educators ought to know about participation literacy.

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