Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 14 by piers young tagged architecture

Many existing facilities could not be easily reconfigured to contain these components. Architects says schools should contain the following elements:
1. Rich, stimulating environments using color, texture, and sound.
2. Places for group learning, such as alcoves and breakout space.
3. Links to the outdoors such as land labs and play fields.
4. Corridors and public places symbolizing the community's larger purpose.
5. Changing displays using interactive media to stimulate brain development.
6. Available resources in close proximity to encourage rich learning.
7. Personalized space for students to express self-identity.
8. Active/passive places for students to engage, reflect and retreat.
9. Flexible space to allow changing with the times.
10. A variety of places of different shapes, colors, lighting, and size.
11. Safe places to feel valued, be nourished and receive help.
12. Places for the community at large to learn and interact.

Share It With Others!

I went looking for a few recent examples of games that deal with architectural themes in some way. I pulled these mostly from a few of the major street games festivals that are out there, such as Come Out & Play, Hide & Seek, Igfest and You Are GO!
Just from this small sample size it is apparent that there are many ways to deal with a city and buildings in a game. You can use the physical layout of a space, or the stories clinging to a place. You can use games to discuss urban processes, or map not only physical but also psychological geography.
Anyway, here’s six games that I found.

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Despite the appearance of permanence that historic buildings create, many if not most of the worlds famous cities have been almost entirely destroyed either by war, property speculation or Ayn Randian architects. They have been rebuilt, either as replicas (Warsaw) or even in the image of the culture that destroyed them (Hiroshima). Here are images where either we or others have matched up locations for incredible before and after shots.

Share It With Others!

The acoustics of new schools will have to be improved after warnings that showcase open-plan designs make it difficult for children to hear.

Share It With Others!

we're not so far away from what Archigram were examining in the 60's. Behaviour and information as the raw material to design cities with as much as steel, glass and concrete.

The city of the future increases its role as an actor in our lives, affecting our lives. This of course, is a recurrent theme in science-fiction and fantasy. In movies, it's hard to get past the paradigm-defining dystopic backdrop of the city in Bladerunner, or the fin-de-siècle late-capitalism cage of the nameless, anonymous, bounded city of the Matrix. Perhaps more resonant of the future described by Greenfield is the ever-changing stage-set of Alex Proyas' Dark City.

Share It With Others!

Industry analysts have been questioning for years whether Twitter is financially viable. Well, maybe it isn't--maybe this particular kind of Internet platform is not destined to be a business. Responsibility for the platform can be distributed among millions of sites and developers, while business opportunities can be built on top of the platform as services in analytics, publicity, and so forth.

Like Google, Twitter and the other leading commercial Internet sites have made tremendous contributions to the functionality of the Internet and have earned both their popularity and (where it exists) their revenue. But the end-to-end principle and the reliability of distributed processing must have their day again, whenever some use of the Internet becomes too important to leave up to any single entity.

Share It With Others!

Educating our children about our planet is a good idea, but if seeing is believing, then maybe we should consider that the next generation of school buildings such as the Redding School of the Arts can serve as potent educational tools for our teachers to utilize in their lesson plans on how to preserve our planet. Buildings are too rarely designed to take the environment into consideration, as historically this just hasn’t ranked highly with the world’s builders. Deforestation, depletion of natural resources, and contamination of the air and water are the result.
So how does a building become a teacher?

Share It With Others!

If all high school, college and university campuses looked like this, attendance rates would skyrocket. Some may argue that it’s what’s inside that’s important, but there’s no reason for school buildings to be bland, boring boxes. From a big open high school where students lounge on big pillows all day to a university building created by Frank Gehry, these 15 incredible campus building designs may just inspire a whole new generation of innovative architects.

Share It With Others!

"One design firm has even proposed that Fleet Street, which crosses the route of the old River Fleet, might turn into a Venetian-style waterway." As opposed to the sewage strewn trickle of filth and dead bodies it used to be. Hurrah!

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT