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Links 1 through 10 of 14 by Ken Robson tagged theory

his site lists books with a major queueing component. Many of the books are out of print, but there are lots of excellent recent queueing books. If you know of a book, or have authored a book that you would like to see added to this list, please send an e-mail to the address below.
Contact: Myron Hlynka at hlynka@uwindsor.ca
URL is http://web2.uwindsor.ca/math/hlynka/qbook.html
Last update: July 13, 2009.
NOTE: The content of this web site was collected by M. Hlynka over many years. The content has also appeared on other web sites without acknowledgement.
I do not sell any of these books and I do not receive any compensation foranything appearing on this site.

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Two system-based views exist regarding managerial value chain analysis: Theory of Constraints (TOC) and Activity-Based Costing (ABC). There has been considerable debate whether TOC or ABC is the more optimal approach for strategic planning. This study seeks to compare TOC and ABC, while keeping constant the level of environmental turbulence each of the approaches encounter. With regard to organizational systems, literature regarding complex adaptive systems supports the idea that bottom-up approaches are more resilient to volatility. Consequently, this study hypothesizes that the bottom-up ABC approach will prove more agile and less limiting than the top-down TOC approach.

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In data mining and treatment learning, association rule learners are used to discover elements that co-occur frequently within a data set[1] consisting of multiple independent selections of elements (such as purchasing transactions), and to discover rules

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We're entering an era where CPU clock speeds will soon cease to scale upwards and instead CPU manufacturers are planning to put more and more independent cores on a chip. Intel plans to release an 80-core chip within 5 years. Consequently the research com

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When Lenny [Susskind] and Alessandro [Tomasiello] invited me to speak here, I said, "I'll be delighted to, as long you realize that my understanding of string theory is about at the level of Brian Greene's TV show." There's a relevant joke -- I don't know

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Before going further about how Bayesian filters work, let’s take a look at the history and the theory behind Bayesianism. The Bayesian theory was named after Reverend Thomas Bayes, a renowned British mathematician who lived in the 18th century.

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In computer science, often the question is not how to solve a problem, but how to solve a problem well. For instance, take the problem of sorting. Many sorting algorithms are well-known; the problem is not to find a way to sort words, but to find a way to

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This site lists books (and course notes) with a major queueing component that are available for FREE online. If you know of any additional book or course notes on queueing theory that are available on line, please send an e-mail to the address below.

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