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Links 1 through 10 of 182 by Michelle Merrill tagged anthropology+evolution

A collection of Alfred Russel Wallace's writings and natural history illustrations.

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Begins with a discussion of Darwin's mental and physical health while working, and his thoughts about the evolutionary function of depression. Also includes a reference to what's become known as Darwinian medicine (the idea that some "symptoms" are responses to illness or injury that evolved to improve recovery). Discusses evolutionary psychology.

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nice images synched to reading of Richard Dawkins' text

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More great basics on evolutionary science, plus articles and "Evo in the News"

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In 1994, Mother Jones Magazine published this story (in comic book format) by a man who was startled to hear what was being taught (or not) about evolution in public school biology classes in Washington state.

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Video shows human population growth just over the last 2000 years.

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Clark Spencer Larsen on dimorphism and what it can (or cannot) tell us about the evolution of hominin mating systems. Larsen discusses the problems of determining levels of dimorphism based on the incomplete nature of the fossil record.

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"Two experts on the evolution of sexual dimorphism, Dr. J. Michael Plavcan (University of Arkansas) and Dr. Phil Reno (Pennsylvania State University), discussed and debated their opposing views on these issues."

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Experiment shows that chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) are more willing to take chances, and more willing to wait for payoffs, than bonobos (Pan paniscus). The difference may be related to the more reliable food supply for wild bonobos. Original article on PLOSOne http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0063058

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Brief (and somewhat sketchy) anthropological consideration of the "Paleo" lifestyle fad. Did humans ever really live the way modern Paleo-types propose? Even if it's close, is it really a prescription for optimum health? Haven't humans evolved in the intervening 10,000 years? Is a paleo diet appropriate? And what concerns me most, is it at all sustainable on a planet with 7 Billion human inhabitants?

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