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Links 1 through 10 of 74 by @nm tagged Viruses

my general recommendation is to uninstall Java -- you really don't want Java on your system unless you absolutely, positively have to have it .. because there are so many new exploits for it.
I would also recommend disabling any plugins you don't absolutely need. Every enabled plugin is an attack surface, and yet another thing that needs to be kept up to date..

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The version of the tool delivered by Microsoft Update and Windows Update runs in the background and then reports if an infection is found. To run this tool more than once a month, use the version on this Web page or install the version that is available in the Download Center.

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Keep Applications Like Acrobat and Flash Updated, or Uninstall Them

Even though we're complaining about people not keeping Windows updated, the fact of the matter is that the most likely cause of drive-by malware infection these days is through your browser plugins. Adobe Flash is notoriously full of security holes, and the latest attacks have been using vulnerabilities in Adobe Acrobat to infect your PC without installing a thing—just go to the wrong site that redirects you in a hidden frame to a PDF file containing the exploit, and your system can be exploited.

Keeping your applications updated is critically important to protecting your security. Your firewall won't protect you, and an antivirus software is unlikely to help if you're using an old, vulnerable version of Flash in your browser—what you need is a piece of software that scans your PC and makes sure that you are using the latest, patched versions. We've got you covered with the five best sof

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This one slip up, which is thought to have been caused by a member of staff connecting an infected USB stick to a council computer, has so far cost in excess of half a million pounds.

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If you can see all six images in both rows of the top table, you are either not infected by Conficker, or you may be using a proxy server, in which case you will not be able to use this test to make an accurate determination, since Conficker will be unable to block you from viewing the AV/security sites.

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* I ran SpinRite. Not for anything malware related, it's just something that made sense to run overnight once the machine was going to be here for a while. (Though, occasionally, boot issues can be the result of hard disk issues that SpinRite can clear up.) The disk scanned clean with no problems at all.

* I ran Memtest86. The machine had recently had additional memory added to it, and I wanted to rule out bad memory as a potential problem. Test passed.

* I did a little research and ended up digging up my own Dell Windows installation (not repair) disk, and booting from that to get into the Recovery Console. Once there, I was able to restore a copy of c:\windows\system32\userinit.exe from the installation CD. That file having gone missing was the cause of the immediate logout on login. Chances are it went missing by virtue of having been infected after which an anti-malware scan quarantined it. I could login again.

* I performed a complete system image backup

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there is a growing belief among engineers and security experts that Internet security and privacy have become so maddeningly elusive that the only way to fix the problem is to start over.

What a new Internet might look like is still widely debated, but one alternative would, in effect, create a “gated community” where users would give up their anonymity and certain freedoms in return for safety. Today that is already the case for many corporate and government Internet users. As a new and more secure network becomes widely adopted, the current Internet might end up as the bad neighborhood of cyberspace. You would enter at your own risk and keep an eye over your shoulder while you were there.

“Unless we’re willing to rethink today’s Internet,” says Nick McKeown, a Stanford engineer involved in building a new Internet, “we’re just waiting for a series of public catastrophes.”

That was driven home late last year, when a malicious software program thought to have been unleashed by

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...but this was a Microsoft release, there's no way this didn't have some virus :-)

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