Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share This URL With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

Links 1 through 10 of 291 by @nm tagged DiscussionGroups

Gormo commented:
> I agree with the article. Facebook's biggest problem is that, because you're always talking to everybody, you really can't say much. Conversation is, and has always been, context-dependent.
Nothing has yet approached traditional web forums, IRC, and even old-school Usenet in this capacity. These forms of online community are clearly-defined social spaces, in which everyone has a direct view to who is and isn't participating. There may be many separate contexts going at any given time, with lots of overlap among participants, but each one is still an independent venue with legible boundaries. Modern "social media" lacks this sense of defined space, which, I think, is necessary for anything to be legitimately called a "community".
Forums and IRC are like a few dozen friends sitting around a table, with everyone engaged in a single coherent conversation at any given time. Twitter and Facebook are like two hundred acquaintances having 40,000 conversations by s

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

What matters is that we [Stack Exchange] allow one level of replies and that's it. Want to reply to a comment? You can, but it'll be at the same level. You can go no deeper. This is by design, but remember: Stack Exchange is not a discussion system. It's a question and answer system. If you build your Q&A; system like a discussion system, it will devolve into Yahoo Answers, or even worse, Quora.

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

The problem with no response is that there are five possible interpretations:
The post is correct, well-written information that needs no follow-up commentary. There's nothing more to say except "Yeah, what he said."
The post is complete and utter nonsense, and no one wants to waste the energy or bandwidth to even point this out.
No one read the post, for whatever reason.
No one understood the post, but won't ask for clarification, for whatever reason.
No one cares about the post, for whatever reason.

—Bryan C. Warnock

Share It With Others!

in the comments: John Matthew Braithwaite
Personally, I think Quora has a major problem (having used and tested it myself) - which is, quite simply, there is no joy in participating.

It is not social insofar as apart from a couple of contacts everyone I have connected with I do not know (so I don't get the Facebook / LinkedIn experience of putting ideas and opinions in front of people I do know). Nor is it free-form and just plain engaging like Twitter - a good answer does require a lot of thought and attention and, even then, it seems you're fighting an uphill battle against obviously co-ordinated 'like me back' trolls - I've seen appalling answers get loads of thumbs up and great ones ignored... not to mention that if you're late to an answer you may as well not bother.

So, the issue of credits is symptomatic of Quora needing to encourage contribution... which is not a good sign for a social network as it suggests exactly the problem I've highlighted: it's not attractive enough to

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!