Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 1019 by @nm tagged Books

I said there will surely be material for a book that simply traces what's currently happening as Scientology seems to be splitting apart.

"I think we could be witnessing a reformation," Urban says, in agreement. "The survival of Scientology may depend on it. If they keep fighting wars on the Internet, it's not a very productive thing for their future. What Rathbun is doing seems like it might have more life to it."

For now, Urban says he's busy with a new project: "One thing I'm trying to do now is create a Church of Scientology archive at our special collections here at Ohio State," he says. He's received material from Nancy Many, who appears prominently in his book, and Chef Xenu, a member of Anonymous who appears in it has also been helping to amass material.

He's also keeping an eye on what Scientology is up to in Columbus, Ohio. "They're building a new Ideal Org in a former Time Warner building. It has capacity for 800 people, which seems a stretch. They told me downtown [at t

Share It With Others!

Hubbard had frequently compared life to a game, and he didn’t want to be ‘playing some minor game in Scientology. It isn’t cute or something to do for lack of something better.’ The game hinged on the idea that we can choose what we perceive to be ‘true’, and discard everything else as an illusion. Yet soon Hubbard’s postmodern religion strove to become a ‘real’ one. His followers – among them hippies as well as educated and ambitious young people – surprised him with the intensity of their belief. Hubbard told a group of doctoral students in Philadelphia in 1954 that his followers were more convinced of Scientology’s cosmology than he was. ‘I’m just kidding you mostly,’ he said. ‘I don’t believe any of these things and I don’t want to be agreed with about them … All I’m asking is that we take a look at this information, and … let’s see if we can’t disagree with this universe, just a little bit.’Hubbard recognised that people’s sense of reality was easily enough undermined, and from

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Temple Grandin’s The Autistic Brain: An excerpt on the history of the autism diagnosis. http://t.co/vmaCDeu0oF #books

Share It With Others!

Parnia: When you die, there’s no blood flow going into your brain. If it goes below a certain level, you can’t have electrical activity. It takes a lot of imagination to think there’s somehow a hidden area of your brain that comes into action when everything else isn’t working.
These observations raise a question about our current concept of how brain and mind interact. The historical idea is that electrochemical processes in the brain lead to consciousness. That may no longer be correct, because we can demonstrate that those processes don’t go on after death.
There may be something in the brain we haven’t discovered that accounts for consciousness, or it may be that consciousness is a separate entity from the brain.
Electrical activity in the brain as a heart enters cardiac arrest. Image: Kano et al./Res

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Olive oil has historically been one of the most frequently adulterated products in the European Union, whose profits, one E.U. anti-fraud investigator told me, have at times been “comparable to cocaine trafficking, with none of the risks.” In America, olive-oil adulteration, sometimes with cut-rate soybean and seed oils, is widespread, but olive oil is not tested for by the F.D.A.—F.D.A. officials tell me their resources are far too limited, and the list of responsibilities far too long, to police the olive-oil trade.

Share It With Others!

Painstakingly researched and sensitively composed, David Graeber’s latest book, Debt: The First 5,000 Years, attempts a retelling of world history in which credit systems underpin the rise—and potential decline—of human civilization. A leading figure in the anti-globalization and anarchist movements, Graeber teaches anthropology at Goldsmiths University of London. Graeber recently visited the Rail’s headquarters to discuss his book with Spencer Woodman.
Portrait of the author. Pencil on paper by Phong Bui.

Spencer Woodman (Rail): Your new book puts debt theory at the center of understanding the global economy, even modern life and history at large. There’s something about the quantitative aspect of debt, the way that it can impersonalize human relationships, that makes it such a powerful force in civilization.

David Graeber: Exactly: The turning of moral obligations into numbers and then using those numbers to justify things that could otherwise never be justified morally. And that’

Share It With Others!

Books that have earned the WAS [Washington Academy of Science] seal
Me Tarzan You Dead, by Peg Kay - Oct 2012
The Form Within, by Karl Pribram - Nov 2012 (to be published January 2013)
A Century of Astronomy from the Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences - Dec 2012
The Hidden Giants, by Sethanne Howard - Dec 2012

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT