Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 321 Wellcome Collection's Bookmarks

"Superhuman at the Wellcome Trust -on till the 16th of October- is a utopian view of technology. It shows us what humanity can do if we harmonise a marriage between technology and humankind, be it cyborg bodies or drug development for use in human enhancement. Although the catch as always is that if not used correctly to improve life, to brave the unknown depths of human experience then we may fly too high, go too near the sun only to loose control and as with Icarus, see it all go to waste and ruin."

Share It With Others!

"The latest installment at the Wellcome Collection in London 'Superhuman' explores the extraordinary ways people have attempted to improve, adapt and enhance their body's performance throughout history. Ethical debates around the augmentation of our bodies are becoming as widespread in everyday life as they are in sports. By including objects such as spectacles and false teeth, the curators of 'Superhuman' reflect on how technologically enhanced our lives already are, thereby drawing our societies fears of technology into question."

Share It With Others!

"The tag-line for the exhibition is 'exploring human enhancement', yet what makes these three items interesting is that they do not enhance the individual's physical capabilities. Take the 19th century silver nose which was worn by a woman whose nose was deformed by syphilis. It wouldn't have been able to sneeze or let her savour the smell of a bacon sandwich. It's purpose was purely aesthetic. The same is true of the unseeing eye we watch being blown in a glass-works, beautifully made but functionally useless."

Share It With Others!

"Featuring contributions from scientists and medics, ethicists, artists, and commentators, this exhibition takes a truly fascinating look at our ceaseless desire and innumerable attempts at self-improvement. It represents an area of science that is exciting and terrifying in roughly equal measure and encourages the visitor to reflect on their own attitudes to the human body."

Share It With Others!

"Three prints of images taken from my documentation of Artist Francesca Steele’s ‘Routine’ – on the near left wall in the photo above – are currently on display at The Wellcome Collection gallery (Euston Road, London) as part of their current ‘Superhuman’ exhibition which runs until the 16th of October 2012. My work was even featured briefly on the BBC Culture Show (screenshot below)."

Share It With Others!

"How do you feel about being disabled? Do you like the word? How about impairment? How would you feel if there was no distinction between disabled people and everybody else? How would you feel if instead of having impairments disabled people had enhancements? Do you think this would change the way you are seen by the press, politicians, the general public?

These are some of the questions that went through my mind as I went round the Superhuman exhibition at the Wellcome Trust."

Share It With Others!

"The Wellcome show is more philosophical than some of their previous over-literal interpretations of ideas. The artworks and objects are given the space and context to communicate for themselves, allowing for complexity and without being killed by over-wordy explanations. The show asks questions and presents ideas about the moral and social implications of human enhancement technology; interweaving artists, scientists, ethicists, philosophers and policy-makers. Ideas include: immortality; the use of cognitive-enhancing drugs to boost brainpower in healthy people; the impact of human enhancement on competitive sport; the wider benefits to society of becoming 'better' people. Questioning whether we should always strive to be as 'normal' as possible, it presents the aftermath of the Thalidomide disaster, which left thousands of children born with shortened limbs."

Share It With Others!

"This was an intriguing discussion and once again I had a sneak peek of the mystery object with Catherine Walker from the Wellcome Collection. The object was a bronze moulded cupped thin piece fitted with a groove for a metal (iron primitive steel) scalpel. It resembled a tiny coffee spoon with a long thin extension, curved with an inside jagged edge. The scalpel end was for making an incision in the right spot and then to probe with the spoon end to remove a bladder stone. The object is well preserved with the bronze mouldings being quite clear. The iron blade for the scalpel had corroded though the groove for the fitting of this double ended instrument was discernible to experts. The surgeon had usually pared his fingernails and applied some olive oil to said finger. In the operation the surgeon would have had the patient sitting legs raised and assistant surgeons would have been on hand to hold down the operating and operated bodies "

Share It With Others!

"The archives within the Wellcome Library are open to all and can be accessed in person provided you have suitable identity; or via the internet if the archives are on the images list. For previous events in the ‘The This Is …’ series, the images department at the Wellcome have sent me images of the touch pieces discussed. For the June gathering, I had been given the catalogue numbers for the items discussed and was able to download them from the Wellcome’s website. I have put these images on the blog, though I can’t read them. (This is similar to my nmr spectra.) "

Share It With Others!

"Last month to the Wellcome Collection, nipped in again to the excellent Brains exhibition. Camden Council sent in their Health & Safety advisor after several visitors fainted when viewing films of ECT treatment and a brain operation – both of which I’d avoided earlier being of a very sensitive nature of course."

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT