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Links 1 through 7 of 7 by Simon Phipps tagged regulation

"Public notices and inquiries should be moved from the newspapers and the bowels of the web online to where we are: networks like Facebook and Twitter." -- An important topic, but the solution proposed here needs thinking through some more to take into account locally-important minority channels.

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Excellent response to the New York Times' article calling for the ergulation of Google, and with a delightful parody of their article as well.

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"There are real privacy issues to be faced in the data collected by web companies. But they are part of a far bigger picture of how the world is changing. We need thoughtful understanding of what the real risks are, not finger pointing by the media (and even more frighteningly, by members of Congress) at companies that are easy targets because they make good political theater." -- Or as Scot NcNealy put it much more concisely, "You have no privacy - get over it."

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This is a very important finding indeed. VoIP applications are information services and thus not subject to the access cgarges that telecoms services have to pay in the US. Could have far reaching repercussions if upheld and repeated in other areas, even the demise of the telco industry as we know it.

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"The first lesson is that markets are not self-correcting. Indeed, without adequate regulation, they are prone to excess. In 2009, we again saw why Adam Smith's invisible hand often appeared invisible: it is not there. The bankers' pursuit of self-interest (greed) did not lead to the well-being of society"

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"In particular, with limits on information and rationality, it may sometimes be better to limit choice but increase competition to supply that choice." Once again it seems a free market with boundaries is better than an unbounded "free market".

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Does Christopher Cox, the Chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commision in the USA, read Jonathan Schwartz's blog? Yes. How do I know? He just posted a very important comment there...

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