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Links 1 through 10 of 173 by Simon Phipps tagged privacy

This is a very worrying development. Borders are places with arbitrary rules, over-empowered and unaccountable officers and no recourse for victims. It is simply wrong to give open-ended powers regarding arguable and intangible "infringements" to these people.

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Longer (and in my view substantially more complex and less readable) than the US Constitution, and changing so often I can't keep track of it. Do Facebook want to prevent us controlling our own privacy by making it too complex to manage?

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I have to assume I and many people I know are on this list.

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Good job someone is paying attention this time. All the same, the way the overall law is shaped is very worrying, as is the mere fact there are people in the process who believe that breach of Terms of Service should be a felony. Seriously, what planet does that come from?

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Sony demonstrates it still has no respect for its customers. This is the same company that installed an exploitable rootkit on its customers computers. Surely the ability to force your customers to surrender their recourse against you has to be a signal that you have monopoly power or something very close to it? I can't help thinking that rights to remedy your supplier's negligence should be inalienable.

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Sony demonstrates it still has no respect for its customers. This is the same company that installed an exploitable rootkit on its customers computers. Surely the ability to force your customers to surrender their recourse against you has to be a signal that you have monopoly power or something very close to it? I can't help thinking that rights to remedy your supplier's negligence should be inalienable.

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This is what happens when you allow lobbyists for oh-so-trustworthy companies (like Sony) to dominate the framing of law. In this case it's obvious and explainable what the problem is, but the opportunity for overreach and abuse of laws like this - especially as regulatory creep makes them broader and more severe - is huge. Just look at what happened to badly-framed wiretap laws from a previous era, allowing recording of police outside the context of the original law to be interpreted as criminal by those wishing to escape scrutiny.

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This is what happens when you allow lobbyists for oh-so-trustworthy companies (like Sony) to dominate the framing of law. In this case it's obvious and explainable what the problem is, but the opportunity for overreach and abuse of laws like this - especially as regulatory creep makes them broader and more severe - is huge. Just look at what happened to badly-framed wiretap laws from a previous era, allowing recording of police outside the context of the original law to be interpreted as criminal by those wishing to escape scrutiny.

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Good job someone is paying attention this time. All the same, the way the overall law is shaped is very worrying.

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Interesting how the government is keen to protect Cliff Richard's pension (by criminalising his fans) and to protect celebrities against hacking yet has no policy to pursue scammers or protect against criminal hacking. Instead they prefer to allow the public domain to be eroded and to follow the advice of lobbyists representing outdated monopolistic business.

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