Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 40 by Simon Phipps tagged iPhone

Did you know that your iPhone (or iPad with 3G) is constantly tracking your position without asking you? It's been doing it ever since you bought the thing. Assuming you're backing up your device to your computer, this application will show you on a map where you have been. Amazingly useful tool for police forces who believe they have the right to search your devices as if they were your pockets when they stop you, too.

Share It With Others!

While OpenLogic understandably has an interest in promoting their services to companies engaged in the development of commercial software, I'd suggest their implication that open source is in some way a special case here is over-stated. Any product that's built using input software written by others needs careful management of the terms under which the copyright is licensed.

That needs careful management processes which are applicable regardless of whether the software is licensed blilaterally under proprietary terms or multilaterally under open source terms. They seem to be asserting that the new smartphone market includes a lot of inexperienced developers who don't realise that. It's surely more a function of the immaturity of the market and its participants than specifically of open source, which is really only implicated here because it's OpenLogic's business, their marketing stunt and the transparency open source brings.

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

This illustrates the wider truth that it's impossible to regulate what's illegal. The big weakness of dictatorial platform control - setting aside it's abhorrent disregard of customer freedoms - is that it encourages an ecosystem to evolve beyond the influence of the platform owner. While Apple can deal with malware that sneaks into the AppStore (and it inevitably will), a philosophy that opposes uncontrolled software encourages dependence on software that has to stay underground to survive, with the consequent risk of it being exploited for evil as well as for innovation.

We saw it in the Prohibition, we can see it in the ridiculous "war on drugs" and we'll see it anywhere people assume "technical measures" can comprehensively succeed. Apple may tar it with a black brush but ultimately it's a demon they invoked themselves.

Share It With Others!

Congratulations to the EFF on this victory for digital liberty. We mustn't over-state the victory, however. The DMCA is still an unnecessarily broad act that chills innovation and liberty for Americans and sets a norm that endangers digital liberty worldwide. Moreover, the acts they have caused to be decriminalised are still covered contractually by the ridiculous terms applied to customers. So the fight for digital liberty is far from over.

Share It With Others!

"We decided from the outset to set the formula for our bars-of-signal strength indicator to make the iPhone look good — to make it look as if it “gets more bars”. That decision has now bitten us on our ass."

Share It With Others!

Gruber has a full analysis of this, but suffice to say that it may not be smart to pay some guy $5000 for a phone he found in a bar that's very obviously Apple's property.

Share It With Others!

Sounds plausible, certainly. What the commentators I've seen so far (including Gruber) are mostly ignoring is that Apple would block Flash even if there were no technical issues (and most of them are probably soluble in some way) since their priority is control of the platform so they can control its monetisation.

It's business, not technology. That means no Flash, no Java, no virtualisation, no interpreted code. The very interesting question will be what they do with HTML5. My prediction: HTML 5 support will be complete but will lag native apps and be poorly integrated with the overall UI.

Share It With Others!

Mark Pilgrim with a eulogy for the freedom to tinker. This is one of the key reasons I'm an advocate of and activist for software freedom.

Share It With Others!

It may be satirical humour but it makes a crucially important point. The reason so many of us stopped trusting Microsoft back in the 90s was we knew that partnering with them only had two exit points: acquisition or the "theft" of our ideas and customers (for me it was the latter). FSJ points out it's deja vue all over again.

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT