Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 70 by Simon Phipps tagged government

Interesting how the government is keen to protect Cliff Richard's pension (by criminalising his fans) and to protect celebrities against hacking yet has no policy to pursue scammers or protect against criminal hacking. Instead they prefer to allow the public domain to be eroded and to follow the advice of lobbyists representing outdated monopolistic business.

Share It With Others!

While funny, this also contains an essential truth about power and responsibility.

Share It With Others!

"Public notices and inquiries should be moved from the newspapers and the bowels of the web online to where we are: networks like Facebook and Twitter." -- An important topic, but the solution proposed here needs thinking through some more to take into account locally-important minority channels.

Share It With Others!

"regulatory capture occurs when a state regulatory agency created to act in the public interest instead advances the commercial or special interests that dominate the industry or sector it is charged with regulating. " -- This also applies to standards bodies and to procurement policies. The only solution in my view is a combination of extreme transparency and a fixed life for the agency after which it has to reboot.

Share It With Others!

Presumably this is the simplified version and there's a security professional who truly understands the nature of multi-factor authentication behind this development. Two things I expected to see mentioned and didn't: open standards (it would be a massive mistake to select a proprietary approach) and national identity cards.

Share It With Others!

One great and smart way to reduce the (legitimate) cost of satisfying freedom of information requests is to publish the data online in machine-readable open formats in the first place. Hopefully the guilty parties here are considering that and not just buying more photocopiers.

Share It With Others!

The move by the new masters in Congress to de-fund all the things in the US that have been recently installed to create more transparency speaks as well of their effectiveness as it does badly of those trying to use budget cuts as an excuse to remove them.

Share It With Others!

There was a time this sort of ignorant, rigged "research" would have been excusable. That time is well past, and the people involved should be ashamed.

Share It With Others!

A spot-on article reviewing the history of UK government lip service to open source and finding it wanting.

Share It With Others!

Excellent move here, although of course the devil is in the details. The big problem with getting open source into government procurement anywhere in the world is that the system by which software is procured is weighted heavily in favour of proprietary software. The changes that are being discussed in the UK are good, but it will take more than this sort of step - easily assimilated by grudging but powerful proprietary vendors and the SIs they own - to make a difference. I have a brief talk at the ODF PlugFest today on this topic.

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT