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Links 1 through 10 of 173 by Simon Phipps tagged Security

After allowing a respectful delay to ensure as many people as possible have upgraded, TDF announces that the most recent release of LibreOffice includes some important security fixes. It's good to see they are doing pro-active research to improve security - and I'm impressed to see a member of staff from Tata involved too, I hadn't realised they were so active.

I checked, and they did submit details of the fix to the OpenOffice.org security mailing list in good time, but I doubt there will be an update of OOo from Apache soon so it would be smart to ensure you have LibreOffice 3.4.3 if you have any earlier releases of OpenOffice.org.

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Sony demonstrates it still has no respect for its customers. This is the same company that installed an exploitable rootkit on its customers computers. Surely the ability to force your customers to surrender their recourse against you has to be a signal that you have monopoly power or something very close to it? I can't help thinking that rights to remedy your supplier's negligence should be inalienable.

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Sony demonstrates it still has no respect for its customers. This is the same company that installed an exploitable rootkit on its customers computers. Surely the ability to force your customers to surrender their recourse against you has to be a signal that you have monopoly power or something very close to it? I can't help thinking that rights to remedy your supplier's negligence should be inalienable.

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Dropbox got lots of bad publicity when they first changed their terms of service and included a broad "all your work belongs to us" clause ion it. But I've not seen any further coverage since they have clarified the ToS to say that they are only seeking sufficient rights to operate the service and do not seek any further rights. They actually responded rather quickly and deserve some congratulations.

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Google seems committed to what I've long called "the freedom to leave", and that's giving me a lot of confidence trying out Plus.

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Great attitude here. There's no reason for them to act - in fact my take is that to do so would put them at greater risk - and anyway, the experience is simply training their software to resist exactly the sort of DDoS attacks being practised...

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This is the online equivalent of a group of people keeping a jar full of Tesco Clubcards by the door so they can get all the benefits without losing their privacy.

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Excellent article. -- "The internet does not exist as untouchable. Morality and the rule of law do apply to the actions people do there. The question is whether those laws are appropriate. ... And the proper response, if there is "unsuitable" (unsuitable to whom, by the way?) content is to go after those who produced and distributed it. Not to seek to block access and sweep it under the rug. That's denial. Let's live in reality."

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