Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 68 by Simon Phipps tagged Europe

Good to have another group advocating on behalf of the public domain. Goodness knows there are enough lobbyists working against it.

Share It With Others!

This is a very good outcome. What makes it most welcome is that it shows there's a growing number of MEPs who understand the issues surrounding the importance of the Internet to vote the right way. We need to build on this with more education and especially with positive reinforcement for those involved.

Share It With Others!

About time too. The current "legal cartel" arrangement in Europe is a sever inhibitor to the emergence of the next stage of the connected society as it means people will only risk being mobile and connected when in their own area. I'll believe it when I see it though, the vested interests here are very powerful and pay many lobbyists.

Share It With Others!

Very interesting article. The practice of "legal blackmail" extends further than this, of course. That would also be an excellent description of the use to which software patents are put by their owners.

While geeks across Europe are comforted by the fact that there are no software patents "as such" in most European countries, the fact is that they exist sufficiently to allow this sort of "legal blackmail" to be conducted throughout Europe. Legal certainty about a claim by a patent owner can only really be obtained at the end of a court case. Given such things are punishingly expensive, it is enough just to threaten most companies in order to trigger settlement.

This is why, despite the rumoured non-existence of software patents, they remain a serious problem for all software companies.

Share It With Others!

Yes, all that work many of us put in to call MEPs and ask them to sign Written Declaration 12 succeeded and at the 11th hour it has become the ratified position of the Parliament.

Share It With Others!

Good pointer here by Glyn to an action we can take to check the effects of pro-patent lobbying in Europe. He misses a trick when he doesn't point out that even RF licensing of patents in standards can be toxic to open source. If the patent holder uses a non-royalty-based restriction - such as the requirement that all legal entities must register for a no-charge license - the lack of a single legal entity to take that action for many open source communities makes it a show-stopper. Worse, if any license so obtained is non-sub-licensable then even the existence of a legal entity would still mean an insurmountable practical barrier existed for the project. Any implicit requirement that the license was necessary would also breach the terms of the license for many projects. In summary: RF is only of if it means "restriction-free", not "royalty-free".

Share It With Others!

Shameful action by the European Commission, who are pressing for patent infringement to be included in the scope of ACTA.

Share It With Others!

The speech by Neelie Kroes last week in Brussels was very carefully constructed and avoided almost all mention of free and open source software. In the spirit of rewarding the good and ignoring the bad, several commentators (such as Karsten here) have been loud in their congratulations but there's still a strong sense that the political cost of even mentioning open source is too high for Europe's politicians.

I see this as a sign of the strength of the concept. The corporate forces that bear down upon the European Commission (even those apparently supporting open source when they speak from the side of their mouth facing the FOSS communities) do so out of fear that they will be forced to act transparently and openly, and we need to keep up the pressure. So I welcome the tiny concessions Kroes made in this speech, and as a concerned and expert citizen I demand more.

Share It With Others!

There are some very worrying phrases in this legislative push, suggesting that the lobbying by big corporations to get rules that favour them is working. Most worrying is the complaint in connection with the digital agenda that "getting patents is too hard". No! It's far, far too easy to get patents on digital technologies and the public commons suffers each time one is issued due to the extreme imbalance that allows them to ve treated as property instead of as responsibility. I smell advance work to clear the path for ACTA ratification...

Share It With Others!

Once again "protecting children" is being used as the pretext to introduce a badly-considered stream of legislation that would result in web searches being retained and analysed - yes, more surveillance. Apparently MEPs are being told just that it's for the children, without having the consequence that every search by every citizen will be archived and retained. Write to your MEP and ask them not to sign or to withdraw their signature.

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT