Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 36 by Simon Phipps tagged EU

It's no surprise to see proof that the USA was heavily engaged in diplomacy on behalf of one of its richest corporations, and the documents certainly have the ring of truth.

Share It With Others!

Stallman is right to call the alarm on unitary patents. We need to resume the defence of the barricades against the pro-patent lobby. It's worth noting, however, that the reason the pro-patent lobby pulled the plug last time (as Stallman says) was not because of the street protests themselves but becuase of the targeted lobbying they permitted. Now would be a great time to consider a donation to the Open Rights Group or FSFE to make sure there will be people in a position to do that direct engagement with legislators this time round; the people who did it last time are no longer available.

Share It With Others!

The European Commission's consultation is in progress until April. It would be very good indeed for as many open source advocates as possible to make positive proposals for change and to share stories of where procurement rules have caused a bias against software freedom, intentionally or otherwise.

Share It With Others!

Landmark publication of the European Interoperability Framework by the European Commission. Let's see if they can stick to this better than they can stick to their own procurement guidelines.

Share It With Others!

FSF Europe continues its very rational and well-argued assault on the European Commission's failure to follow its own rules.

Share It With Others!

"lobbyists have attempted to put the focus on "mixed solutions with open and proprietary code" and have FRAND licenses declared compatible with open software"

The people involved definitely should know better than this. While it is possible to build specific cases of FRAND licensing that can be considered compatible with open source licensing, the class in general never can be and the voices saying otherwise should be ashamed of themselves as they attempt to sell everyone's freedoms in exchange for corporate marketing dollars.

Share It With Others!

Good pointer here by Glyn to an action we can take to check the effects of pro-patent lobbying in Europe. He misses a trick when he doesn't point out that even RF licensing of patents in standards can be toxic to open source. If the patent holder uses a non-royalty-based restriction - such as the requirement that all legal entities must register for a no-charge license - the lack of a single legal entity to take that action for many open source communities makes it a show-stopper. Worse, if any license so obtained is non-sub-licensable then even the existence of a legal entity would still mean an insurmountable practical barrier existed for the project. Any implicit requirement that the license was necessary would also breach the terms of the license for many projects. In summary: RF is only of if it means "restriction-free", not "royalty-free".

Share It With Others!

There are some very worrying phrases in this legislative push, suggesting that the lobbying by big corporations to get rules that favour them is working. Most worrying is the complaint in connection with the digital agenda that "getting patents is too hard". No! It's far, far too easy to get patents on digital technologies and the public commons suffers each time one is issued due to the extreme imbalance that allows them to ve treated as property instead of as responsibility. I smell advance work to clear the path for ACTA ratification...

Share It With Others!

In the closest thing we'll see to a unanimous multi-partisan vote in any modern democracy, the European Parliament resolved that ACTA negotiations must be transparent, must be limited to existing EU law and must not make three-strikes and other sociopathic ideas mandatory. This is the first big obstacle to the secret corporate juggernaut that has been rolling to trade our freedoms for corporate profits and it's fantastic news.

Share It With Others!

This is an excellent motion, placing restraint on the ability of the European Commission to conduct opaque negotiations that will effectively bind the European parliament before they have been exposed and reviewed. Looking forward to reading the highlights of the debate. If you have a fast-track to your MEP, this is worth mentioning to them.

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT