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Links 1 through 10 of 20 by Simon Phipps tagged China

The issue at stake here is what some call "common-carrier status" fro networks. Regardless of the excuse - be it China's hatred of protest, Italy's hatred of pædophiles or the USA's hatred of music lovers - governments should be protecting it. Once the principle has been breached, it is a slippery slope to a corporate-controlled society, whether the corporation is question is the state, the RIAA or, indeed, Google or Microsoft.

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Tone-deaf editorial by the Chinese government coruscates Clinton & Google while actually casting light on the paranoia that makes China censor its citizens and force them to live by rumour.

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Schneier points out that the feature China hacked in GMail was only there because the US government demanded it "for security", and that building trapdoors for use by spooks is an invitation for bad guys to hack them. They are another example of why security through obscurity is an anti-pattern.

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Google doubtless understands that the Chinese government don't respond well to public statements like this. I expect them to get far less diplomatic, directly-reude responses in fact. But after attempting to do things China's way, it's hard to see what other principled response they could take to the betrayal fot he trust they had placed in the Chinese government by toeing their line for three years. Google's business will increasingly depend on being globally trusted and this sort of political behaviour is a business necessity for them. It also challenges their competitiors to make a stand. Sadly, I expect most of them to be in Chinese government offices right now offering to fill the gap Google will leave. To understand why, Google "webmink reptiles".

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The technology market in China gets more an more interesting by the day. They have long been tuning western trade practices (patents related to national standards as a barrier to foreign domination, for example), are in the middle of understanding open source better than most western nations and now are adopting anti-trust law.

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Hmm, do I detect a trend here? All the technical excellence in the world will have no effect if it is only used to cheat.

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"Nonetheless, to watch U.S. Senators like Sam Brownback actually maintain a straight face while protesting China's warrantless spying ... is so surreal that it's actually hard to believe one is seeing it."

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My, how the Chinese have learned skills from the international arena. No self-consciousness at all about forming a cartel to conduct anti-trust actions, it seems.

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This seems to encapsulate the whole problem.

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