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Links 1 through 10 of 377 by Wayne Marshall tagged tech

Q: So how is it that Caribbean music, rather than what we traditionally think of as “Brazilian music, ” took off in Belém?

A: The story is often told the following way: That short-wave radio was used to pick up Caribbean frequencies because radio broadcasts from the south of Brazil arrived with bad reception.

I think that’s part of the story. I think an important piece of the puzzle is the sound-system institution, which begins in the 1950s and ‘60s with people simply hooking up turntables to loud speakers. These sound systems began to proliferate in Belém’s residential neighborhoods, and one way they found to compete with one another was to spin exclusive records, the harder to come by, the better.

A lot of the albums that sound systems played were being brought by contrabandists to Belém. They had never been released in Brazil before, so the sound systems would use these albums to do what they call fazer farol—to shine a spotlight or a beacon that would attract audiences.

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fascinating possibility! 'Despite revealing to Engadget that the Eddie Cochran and Sex Pistol rumors are false, she did admit the preset was based on a rock track. A British rock record from the 70s is all she would confirm. “You would immediately notice it once you hear the song.” I don’t have contact information for Hiroko Okuda, but I am positive that the track she is referring to is “Hang Onto Yourself” by David Bowie. If there’s another “British rock record from the 70s” that sounds more like Sleng Teng, I’d like to hear it. So, the history of the song that started a new era in Jamaican music can be traced back to David Bowie. I’m not saying this is anything more than an accident of circumstance, but I have a feeling that the more one examine’s Bowie’s career, the more such accidents one will find. '

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great piece on the origins of the sleng teng pre-set: 'Hiroko Okuda started at Casio in 1980, straight after graduating in Musicology from Tokyo's Kunitachi College of Music. She remains at Casio to this day, but the MT40 was the first project she worked on. Despite creating that rock preset, she has no idea where the Eddie Cochran rumor came from, or why it's so persistent. Okuda is also keen to point out that most people assume the preset was taken out of musical context by King Jammy and co., this giving the story half of its charm. A misused rock rhythm, birthing reggae's monster riddim. But again, the real story is stranger than the legend.'

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'Definitions can be slippery, but the roots of electronic rabòday can be found in rara, a music older than Haiti itself. It began with the indigenous Taíno people, mixed with rhythms brought from Africa by slaves, and eventually morphed and modernized into a style that today is played by roving musicians throughout the country. … Drum rhythms have names and contexts, many that can be traced back to the distinct African peoples that fused together to form Haiti, and “rabòday” is the name of one that’s long been favored by these rara bands. In recent years, a new electronic incarnation of rabòday — digitized and crunched with frenetic urgency — exploded to become one of the defining sounds of a young, disaster-surviving generation of Haitians.'

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'There’s a saying that “it’s not the tool, it’s the artist.” In the case of FL Studio, though, you could argue that the tool helped shape the artists just as much as the artists helped popularise the tool. Despite its modest beginnings in Europe’s bureaucratic heart, FL Studio – formerly known as FruityLoops – became the defining music software of the ‘00s.'

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notes on re-limiting the pitch adjustment slider on technics (e.g., how moortje made analog speed bubbling)

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Mike Steyels on the latest Harlem dance to make the rounds, including this bit on the role of "social media": "Youtube and Soundcloud are how the sound is spread, even among those in the scene.:

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There's no simple way of describing the music Príncipe releases. Kuduro, a style of Angolan music and dance that began in the early '90s and became widely popular in Portugal, is an integral component, but Príncipe's style also includes batida, kizomba, funaná, house, afro house and tarraxinha, genres mostly (but not exclusively) rooted in Angola, Cape Verde and São Tomé E Príncipe. Príncipe has now released five records, and has received lots of interest from press and promoters outside of Portugal. DJ Marfox and DJ Nigga Fox, one of Príncipe's other signings, have both played parties on the European electronic music circuit, including CTM festival in Berlin and Unsound in Poland. After their set at Unsound, RP Boo, one of the festival's other bookings, approached the pair. "I don't know where you guys came from, I don't know what this is… but this is some of the best music I've heard in my life," he said. '

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RA talks to Marfox: How would you describe your music to someone who had never heard it? It's 100% dancing and vibrant music, somewhere between house and techno, at 140 BPM. It has short and dynamic variations, which easily makes any dance floor sweat—it is natural and hot. (Mind you, when I say "natural" it is with the clear purpose of letting you know that 99% of this music is produced on one of the most criticized software programs, Fruity Loops, and that 99% of the people that are making this music in Lisbon have no formal musical training).

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