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Links 1 through 10 of 37 by Wayne Marshall tagged kuduro

There's no simple way of describing the music Príncipe releases. Kuduro, a style of Angolan music and dance that began in the early '90s and became widely popular in Portugal, is an integral component, but Príncipe's style also includes batida, kizomba, funaná, house, afro house and tarraxinha, genres mostly (but not exclusively) rooted in Angola, Cape Verde and São Tomé E Príncipe. Príncipe has now released five records, and has received lots of interest from press and promoters outside of Portugal. DJ Marfox and DJ Nigga Fox, one of Príncipe's other signings, have both played parties on the European electronic music circuit, including CTM festival in Berlin and Unsound in Poland. After their set at Unsound, RP Boo, one of the festival's other bookings, approached the pair. "I don't know where you guys came from, I don't know what this is… but this is some of the best music I've heard in my life," he said. '

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RA talks to Marfox: How would you describe your music to someone who had never heard it? It's 100% dancing and vibrant music, somewhere between house and techno, at 140 BPM. It has short and dynamic variations, which easily makes any dance floor sweat—it is natural and hot. (Mind you, when I say "natural" it is with the clear purpose of letting you know that 99% of this music is produced on one of the most criticized software programs, Fruity Loops, and that 99% of the people that are making this music in Lisbon have no formal musical training).

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' “Solution-neutral creative brand experience?” The flags came up in full force: Since when did corporate marketing double-speak trickle into the world of kuduro? The deeper I went, the site felt more like an ad campaign than an artist’s homepage. So, I wondered, what does this mean for the future of “world music” marketing and for the Angolan tradition of music and dance in particular? And who is footing the bill? … The twenty-first century’s hip, urban “world music 2.0” consumers are used to a certain type of intermediary when it comes to digging up booty-shaking diamonds and gems—DJs, bloggers, renegade ethnomusicologists, and adventurous globe-trotting label owners, for the most part. I personally have turned to Frederic Galliano, Chief Boima, DJ Zhao, Diplo, and others for their kuduro selections. ... Casual observers might not perceive the fundamental differences between a DJ and a corporate marketing agency. '

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'This article explores the role of Kuduro, the popular Angolan electronic music and dance style in the process of updating the national Angolan identity called angolanidade to the conditions of the new millennium.'

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1st post (of 2) exploring the advent of fruityloopy percussive kuduro tracks in the caribbean

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interview w/ daniel haaksman --

'In early 2004…Haaksman brought home a ton of funk; including a large number of records… Just like many of the Pan Am stewardesses who had acted as vinyl-mules to foster funk in Brazil from the US in the 90s, Haaksman was doing the same for Europe.

“…I didn’t speak Portuguese (though I know it now) so I could listen to language as ‘sound’.” …he could detach himself from the lyrics in the same way he approached American hip hop. And what sound there was came very, very loud: “[I]t’s all about volume. You can’t stand it because it’s just so loud that people just don’t care – for them it’s for the physical enjoyment of the sound.”

“You have this super network of DJs and producers doing this type of music and it’s also possible now to directly communicate with cultures across the globe like Brazil, Angola, South Africa without going through the major labels – it’s more person to person and that’s a very new and revolutionary moment.”

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'Like many high school kids in Luanda, Delany started messing around with Fruity Loops. The software is hardly avoidable in Angola… During his first years playing around with Fruity Loops, Delany was mainly making semba and kuduro-inspired beats. The shifting point for him was moving to Namibia in 2008. Like many middle and upper class Angolan teen-agers, Delany left the country to attend university. And like many Angolans studying in Windhoek, Jozi or Durban, Delany caught the South African house bug.

What’s interesting to me here is that like many other young Angolan afro-house producers, Delany keeps a distinctly Angolan feel in his beats. This is probably what is allowing him, DJ Djeff and the like to take over Angolan nightclubs: they are not just playing or making afro-house, they are creating Angolan house. The difference might be subtle for most of us, but for someone raised on semba and kuduro, it’s huge.'

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zhao explains new kuduro mix: 'Kuduro can also be playful, humorous, soulful, emotional, ominous, scary, joyful, celebratory, and uplifting. It is also sonically adventurous in radical ways, fearless in its pushing and often destruction of dance music’s aesthetic boundaries…: from sweet accordions to reckless synths, from 8-bit game console palettes to near industrial noise, from samples distorted way beyond recognition to some of the deepest basslines in the world. …this mix adopts quite a few Detroit Ghetto-Tech and Chicago Juke samples, to draw parallels between inner-city Afro-diaspora underground and African urban sound. Because, at least from where i’m standing, the Parallels are many: relentless and insistent focus on rhythm; use of repetition past the point of monotony in becoming pure abstraction; fast tempo and intensity pushing the dancefloor near breaking-point; gritty, raw, and unpolished sound; and finally, ruthless libidinal energy which defies any attempts at restraint'

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'The western hipster habit of magpieing over a new street genre every year is not always edifying; in particular, the tendency to drop it with alacrity once it becomes passé lends credence to accusations of cultural tourism. The past decade alone has seen funk carioca, soca, reggaeton and kuduro come and go from Dalston basements, all the while remaining staples of their places of origin. ...the same is true for...African house. ...Unlike funk carioca or kuduro, then – which were picked up and discarded wholesale – African house has informed and influenced British clubs, even as both look towards New York and Detroit as primary sources. Could this kind of Moebius loop of appropriation and recontextualisation have happened at any point in the past? More than ever, it seems that any given aesthetic sensibility is simultaneously able to cultivate strong, street-level, localised roots while also being fundamentally untethered, able to spread around the world and back with ease.'

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