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Links 1 through 10 of 354 by Wayne Marshall tagged internet

'In this second of a two-part series on selling contemporary African beats to colonial Europe, Lloyd Gedye explores the power relationships in these trafficking circles, and what it means for the artists and the scene. Just who benefits from feeding Europe’s dance floors?'

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Christina Xu tracks the surprising peregrinations of a Sao Paolo funk song through Thailand & Cambodia

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Mike Steyels on the latest Harlem dance to make the rounds, including this bit on the role of "social media": "Youtube and Soundcloud are how the sound is spread, even among those in the scene.:

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'The first record to carry the genre-tag "Jersey Club" was Tameil's 2001 Dat Butt EP, released on then-label Anthrax. In the early 2000s, Newark-based Club crowds tired of traditional New York house and turned to Baltimore's rhythmically aggressive, more hip-hop-friendly take, which made the tracks more accessible to younger audiences. … And it was amid the racks of the store [Music Liberated] that Tameil had originally met the icons of the Baltimore sound, the innovators who fused Miami Bass, house, breakbeat, and hip-hop into a frenetic, drum-laden dance music for the city: DJs like Rod Lee (“Dance My Pain Away”), DJ Technics (“Party People”), Scottie B (co-founder of Unruly Records), DJ Booman, KW Griff, and Jimmy Jones of the Doo Dew Kidz. …time is proving that younger innovators have more options. The Internet is now their Music Liberated: Soundcloud mixes, YouTube dance instructionals, and free, downloadable EPs have spawned an entirely new generation of producers.'

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'Abstract: Mashups, also known as bootlegs or bastard pop, epitomize current changes in the production of, and interaction with, popular culture. Mashup artists utilize computer technology to remix and reshape the culture around them, and to build and maintain community. By looking at the history of the mashup genre, the dispersed nature of the mashup community, the production techniques used by mashup producers, and the impacts of copyright law, this article demonstrates that the mashup genre and the worldwide community of its fans and producers are on the cutting edge of popular music, technology, and copyright. '

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jon caramanica on asap yams (& rocky): "Much of what you hear in Rocky — a fully assimilated take on hip-hop styles from across the country and from across time periods — can be traced back to Yams, who spent his formative years studying the genre, then learning how to transmit his taste to others. Hip-hop has long been obsessed with fealty to a specific place and time, and Yams’s vision of the genre as an open house, not a fortress, qualifies as a radical one. …

The Tumblr was entertainment, a map of modern hip-hop taste, and, for Yams, also a strategic gambit, “a setup.” Using Tumblr, a blogging platform that allows easy sharing of content, was a conscious choice: “It’s like advertisement.” He was building a reputation as an online tastemaker, spotlighting up-and-coming artists and advocating for a taste level that would be receptive to Rocky’s sound when it was unleashed."

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noz on today's rap metrics:

'During the decade or so that followed [Efil4zaggin], rap record sales were a reasonably accurate reflection of its core audience's taste (for better or worse). Sales had become a conduit for the interests of listeners who were historically underrepresented in the mainstream media. Even when the press and industry ignored grassroots stars-- usually of the regional or gangsta disposition-- the numbers spoke for themselves.

These days, rap album sales still dominate the conversation amongst the more dedicated fans of the genre. Major sites report first week numbers as if they're box scores, and fans violently hurl SoundScan data amongst one another and back @rappers via Twitter. A strong first-week outing can define the popular perception of an artist's relevance, a weak one can instantly destroy a career. The only problem is: Sales don't matter anymore. At all.'

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'Figo has found a way to make his songs feel like more than a musical aside, influenced by predecessors like Ahmed Adaweya, a musician who gained widespread fame in the 1970s for a sweaty, roughneck shaabi (meaning literally, “of the people”) sung in an Egyptian dialect as opposed to elegant Arabic. At 20, Figo has bypassed his predecessors and their reliance on traditional musicality, and showed Egypt what it can sound like to make music with nothing but a computer. About six years ago, Figo began searching “how to make beats” on YouTube. He doesn’t speak English, so studying screenshots had to suffice, and he began making songs that kept with the anti-sentimental and ultra-local attitude of shaabi while electrifying it with imported genres like hip-hop and techno.'

'the rugged baladi rhythms, ever popular at weddings, shed their folksy connotations when programmed on drum machines.'

''Like many Egyptians, Shawka hears this latest development in shaabi…as nothing but unskilled noise

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