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Links 1 through 10 of 266 by Wayne Marshall tagged academic

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Kendra Salois on hip-hop in Morocco:

'Moroccan hip-hop emerged in the early 1990s alongside the first effects of these neoliberalizing policies. As a foreign form first brought to the country through Moroccans’ travel on historically carved routes to Europe and the Francophone world, the hiphop my interlocutors make has always been simultaneously about local priorities and translocal connections, about repping your derb (street) to your city and your city to the world. First learning from friends and family abroad, then satellite television, and finally today’s Internet-based social media, practitioners—musicians, dancers, graf artists and fans—have honed their craft through countless hours of research, listening, watching, and practicing with their peers. Today, not only Casablancans but youth in all the major Moroccan cities and many smaller towns across the country, create and socialize within a thriving hip-hop network with its own stars, its own stylistic battles, its own venues'

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'As a part of its collaboration with the Born This Way Foundation, the Berkman Center is preparing a series of different working papers that help synthesize scholarship and provide research-based recommendations for action. Ultimately, they will form a paper series: The Kinder & Braver World Project: Research Series (danah boyd and John Palfrey, editors), presented by the Born This Way Foundation & the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University, and supported by the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.'

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ignatiev's classic race traitor / anti-whiteness piece: "Now that White Studies has become an academic industry, with its own dissertation mill, conference, publications, and no doubt soon its junior faculty, it is time for the abolitionists to declare where they stand in relation to it. Abolitionism is first of all a political project: the abolitionists study whiteness in order to abolish it. … We are anti-white, but we are not in general against the people who are called white. Those for whom the distinction is too subtle are advised to read the speeches of Malcolm X. … The white race is neither a biological nor a cultural formation; it is a strategy for securing to some an advantage in a competitive society. It has held down more whites than blacks. Abolitionism is also a strategy: its aim is not racial harmony but class war. By attacking whiteness, the abolitionists seek to undermine the main pillar of capitalist rule in this country. …"

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from a public debate about links between daggerin and kumina:

'While admitting that much of the moves in dancehall are steeped in our African heritage, Professor Rex Nettleford, founding artistic director of the National Dance Theatre Company, pointed out that dancehall crosses a barrier that traditional dances don't.

"Most of the dances today are very much rooted in our African-derived dances (however) while you use the pelvis, it needs not be lewd," said the professor.'

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