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Links 1 through 10 of 3431 Wayne Marshall's Bookmarks

Q: So how is it that Caribbean music, rather than what we traditionally think of as “Brazilian music, ” took off in Belém?

A: The story is often told the following way: That short-wave radio was used to pick up Caribbean frequencies because radio broadcasts from the south of Brazil arrived with bad reception.

I think that’s part of the story. I think an important piece of the puzzle is the sound-system institution, which begins in the 1950s and ‘60s with people simply hooking up turntables to loud speakers. These sound systems began to proliferate in Belém’s residential neighborhoods, and one way they found to compete with one another was to spin exclusive records, the harder to come by, the better.

A lot of the albums that sound systems played were being brought by contrabandists to Belém. They had never been released in Brazil before, so the sound systems would use these albums to do what they call fazer farol—to shine a spotlight or a beacon that would attract audiences.

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'Many dancehall followers also threw jabs at Goebel, tagging her in many of the comments they made. Goebel, in an attempt to shield herself from the attacks, threatened to block some Instagram followers who left "negative comments". "If you know me personally or have worked with me before you will know that I LOVE dancehall and have such a huge respect and passion for it. A lot of my routines before sorry have been inspired by dancehall," Goebel said in a Facebook post. "A lot of my close friends are dancehall teachers and I took a lot of my year this year learning about it because I love it so much. So when this Justin Bieber opportunity came along I thought it would be perfect to showcase dancehall inspiration in a commercial video clip to bring more LIGHT to Dancehall. Unfortunately people are reading so deep and misunderstanding the whole situation and creation of this clip (video). '

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'the visuals for “Formation” offer up New Orleans as convergence place for a blackness that slays through dreams, work, ownership, legacy, and the audacity of bodies that dare move and live in the face of death.'

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'“You can’t wear a thong. You must keep the cleft of your buttocks covered. And you cannot simulate a sex act.” Rusty Hannah of Mississippi’s Alcoholic Beverage Control there, explaining why a concert by bounce artist Big Freedia was cancelled. While also reminding everyone how funny the word “cleft” is. Freedia’s show in the town of Hattiesburg would have been, Rusty says, in contravention of 30-year-old laws drawn up to prevent strip clubs selling strong booze. Basically, an establishment in Mississippi can’t provide risqué entertainment while also selling strong liquor. Beer is fine for some reason, but not the hard stuff. And because Frieda’s show would certainly involve twerking, the venue hosting the concert, the Dollar Box Showroom, was threatened with closure if the concert went ahead.'

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'Silentó's maniacally catchy track not only cracked YouTube's 10 most watched music videos of the year, but also became a runaway dance phenomenon. The dance spawned thousands of imitators who served to amplify the effect of the official video's 622 million — and counting — views. A video of toddler Heaven King dancing to the song was named YouTube's most viral video of the year. But if you think the dance's success was a happy accident for the artist, a viral hit that simply captured the imagination of the public at the right time, you're wrong. The explosion in popularity of the "Whip/Nae Nae" dance was pushed along by a carefully orchestrated campaign from one particular company.'

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'Not all of the tracks you'll hear at a KUNQ party hold up to institutional standards for audio quality. Much of their source material is taken from severely compressed YouTube videos and radio rips. Many of the tracks themselves were excavated from sketchy file-sharing websites or bootleg mix CDs, uploaded or burned by users who aren't concerned by the difference between a 196kbps MP3 and a .WAV file. … The bit-rate matters less when audio is only one part of a multi-faceted experience. KUNQ parties are interactive—full of acrobatic dancing and audience participation. Rizzla compared this to the sometimes more solitary, inside-your-head vibe of the average house or techno dance floor. …"Even just the pleasure of hearing people scream over a scratchy vocal track when they recognize it—there's something sonic that happens there. You can hear their voices yelling over your bad MP3 and it makes that bad MP3 more powerful."'

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'…one time we were doing a show or something and somebody was crying in the record - and myself, I just flipped a microphone on and wanted to know why she was crying. And she answered in singing, you know. Then I would tell her, “Well I know why you crying. ‘Cause you haven’t been over to my house for a couple of weeks” - or somethin’ like that. And boy, the audience fell out with that. People would go to the store and try to buy the record and they couldn’t find my voice in the record, and they’d want to turn the record back. But that began what we called “personality radio.” We were very involved in the records. We talked with the records. We sang with the records. We ran trains through the records. We had folks laughing and using all kind of sound effects and everything we could. But, it made entertainment because each disc jockey that was on the air at that particular time had his own style.'

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'By any usual standard, “Hit The Quan” could be considered an amateur’s amusing spinoff of a hit by an established star. But this week, “Hit The Quan” reached a new peak: number 15 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart. That’s higher than “Flex,” which reached number 26 over the summer. It's higher than every other song Rich Homie Quan has ever released, too, including his biggest hit, Rich Gang’s “Lifestyle,” which peaked at number 16 in 2014. The tail is wagging the dog, in a way that illustrates how virality drives chart hits in 2015. Both rappers performed their respective hits at the BET Hip Hop Awards this week—separately, despite the unusual way the two songs have been tied together in the public mind. It was probably appropriate foreshadowing. There are going to be people dancing to “Hit The Quan” who have never even heard of Rich Homie Quan, if there aren’t already.'

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