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Links 1 through 10 of 172 by Edward Vielmetti tagged search

simple, straightforward dump of new patents day by day by company, not all companies there but lots of tech companies represented

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I’ve located all of the granted Google patents that I could find that were either listed in the assignment database at the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) or noted in their granted patents database as assigned to Google. I haven’t included Google’s pending patent applications.

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Interviews with prominent experts in the field of information retrieval, internet search and text mining.
Interviewer: Peter Kawinek

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On content-heavy websites, the search box is often the most frequently used design element. From a usability point of view, irritated users use the search function as a last option when looking for specific information on a website. If a website’s content is not organized properly, an efficient search engine is not only helpful but crucial, even for basic website navigation. In fact, search is the user’s lifeline to mastering complex websites. The best designs offer a simple search box on the home page and play down advanced search and scoping.

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Since my job change at the end of September, I’ve noticed that my professional interests and reading habits have shifted quite a bit. In particular I’ve noticed that most of the library blogs to which I’ve subscribed don’t seem as relevant any more. Consequently I’ve unsubscribed from most of them. I wonder, am I losing librarianship? I’m proud to be a librarian, don’t get me wrong. And I’m not exactly thrilled about all aspects of corporate life and the silly pap that I sometimes need to consume as part of that. But I do really like my new, expanded role focusing on search and taxonomy, with the opportunities for learning new things and expanding my horizons. As part of that I’m looking around for other sources of information in the blogosphere and elsewhere that will help me keep well informed and current, and I don’t have as much time for keeping up-to-date with purely library-related things.

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In its own quiet way, Google Scholar has become a major force in scholarly communication. For many researchers, faculty, and students, it is the first search tool used, challenging the popularity and utility of veteran databases licensed—often at considerable cost—by academic and corporate libraries. Yet announcements about changes in the constantly evolving service seem to occur rarely and with little ballyhoo. For example, did you know that Google Scholar has launched its own digitization project, separate from the high-profile Google Book Search mass digitization? Or what about the new Key Author feature? Or the expansion into non-English languages and non-U.S./Western European content? A conversation with Anurag Acharya, the designer and missionary behind Google Scholar, helped us catch up on the latest developments.

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When I interned at Google last summer after getting my MSI degree, I worked on projects for the Book Search and Google Scholar teams. I didn’t know it at the time, but in completing my research over the course of the summer, I would become the resident expert on how universities were approaching Google Scholar as a research tool and how they were implementing Scholar on their library websites. Now working at an academic library, I seized a recent opportunity to sit down with Anurag Acharya, Google Scholar’s founding engineer, to delve a little deeper into how Scholar features are developed and prioritized, what Scholar’s scope and aims are, and where the product is headed.

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The Google Blog Search results have generally been the fastest and most useful tool of this kind (Google displaced Technorati, which had long served in this role, some time ago). But a couple of months ago Google Blog Search started becoming pretty much useless. Instead of only reporting links from the “main” blog content, it reported all links on a blog page, including the so-called “sidebar” or blogroll, where many bloggers place a lengthy static list of blogs they read.

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The launch of ticTOCs, the U&I funded Journal Tables of Contents Service, is getting a good reception from bloggers around the world.

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Mahaney reaches this conclusion after chatting up industry insiders at a search industry marketing confab in Park City, Utah (someone has to go to these things). In a nutshell, he has something approaching a gut feeling that next quarter may be the first time in the history of search that the industry doesn’t actually grow. In analyst-speak, “Q1 could actually be the real inflection point quarter–i.e., the first negative sequential growth quarter ever for Search.”

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