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Links 1 through 10 of 16 by Edward Vielmetti tagged fruit

This was an assignment from “Malaise, Melancholy and the Production of Art”, taught by Jacob Berman: walk for a couple of hours in a place you’ve never walked before and then write about it in the style of The Rings of Saturn by W. G. Sebald.

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The large and fine plates are all drawn by A.J. Wendel and lithographed by G. Severyns. Severeyns was one of the most famous Belgian chromolithographers of the period. Belgian lithographers reached the ultimate of craftsmanship during the 19th century. Some of the finest pomological works come from his establishment such as the plates of Bull and Hogg's 'The Herefordshire Pomona', Decaisne's 'Jardin Fruitier du museum', and Berghuis' 'Nederlandsche Boomgaard'. Together with Noort's 'Pomologia Batava' and Berghuis' 'Nederlandsche Boomgaard' it is one of the only three Dutch illustrated works on pomology, which were published during the 19th century. The very fine illustrations depict flowers and fruit growing in the Netherlands. Nissen BBI, 1474.

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Lately, I learned how to make Candied Orange Peels which I am excited to share with you. I used to hate candied fruits peels; I found them too sweet, sometimes too gooey or too dry. But with this recipe I know that I will never go to back to buy candied fruits again. Because mine are so much better, with all modesty of course, and so easy to make.

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The pawpaw is a delicious fruit indigenous to this country and was eaten by native Americans and early settlers. The fruit has a distinctive creamy custard texture and a sweet mango banana like flavor. It is excellent when eaten fresh, and delicious in puddings, cookies, pies, ice cream and breads. Pawpaw fruit is reported to be higher in proteins and carbohydrates than apples, peaches and grapes, and it contains high levels of amino acids, vitamins A and C, and many minerals. Pawpaw ( Asimina triloba ) is the only temperate climate member of the tropical family Annonaceae, which includes the cherimoya, a cultivated fruit popular in the tropics. In the wild it grows from southern Michigan to Georgia and from the Atlantic coast to Kansas. It is generally found in the understory of wooded areas, especially in rich moist bottomlands and along streams. The tree will grow in well drained upland wooded areas, although in these locations the fruit may be less abundant and somewhat smaller.

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The North American Fruit Explorers (NAFEX) is a network of individuals throughout the United States and Canada devoted to the discovery, cultivation and appreciation of superior varieties of fruits and nuts. Founded in 1967 by a small group of pomological hobbyists, NAFEX has grown to an organization of more than 3,000 members, and is chartered as a nonprofit organization in the state of Illinois. Although the ranks of our membership include professional pomologists, nurserymen, and commercial orchardists, NAFEX members are all AMATEURS in the truest sense of the word; they are motivated by their LOVE of fine fruit.

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I’ve made this pie dough recipe a dozen times now, easy, and it is the one that I am using in my book, and I really can’t say enough good things about it. It’s buttery and impossibly flaky and has yet to let me down, and on several occasions, it has even inspired perfectly sated people to beg for seconds. I don’t know about you, but that’s what I look for in a pie dough. Top it with some ripe, fragrant apricots, a little sugar, and a bit of salt, and you’re in business, as they say. In the heat of the oven, the dough goes golden, crisp, and toasty, and the apricots release their juices to mingle with the sugar, forming a glossy, sweet-tart glaze that settles under and around them. Cut into wedges and dolloped with crème fraîche, it’s the closest you can get to serving summer on a dessert plate. And when you run out of chocolate chip cookies, that’s not a bad idea.

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A week or so ago a new friend emailed me. She had tried out Orangette’s recipe for apricot tart. Apparently it was dazzling. My friend‘s a wonderful writer and the combination of two good writers and one great recipe made me desperate to make this delicacy for our next supper party.

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Finally one summer, my girlfriend brought me a present she found at a local yard sale. It's an old, aluminum orange press. Basically, it's a round bowl with a hinged pressing plate attached to a 12-inch lever arm. It's all made of thick, sturdy aluminum, and withstands the rigors of pomegranate pods admirably. Suddenly, and just in time for pomegranate season, we had a press sufficient for our needs. Two dozen pomegranates later, we had jars and jars of delicious pomegranate jelly, and a half a dozen jars of precious pomegranate experiments.

Those experiments were, as I always tell people to do, variations on the central theme. I knew that my good pomegranate liqueur had a certain proportion of pomegranates, lemon peel, sugar and alcohol, but I wanted to me sure, and I wanted to undrestand some things about the seeds and skins.

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you got fresh peaches, and strawberries and blueberries and cherries and plums and melons and even mulberries, which are not really very good but which I ate in large quantities because we always seemed to have a mulberry tree in our yard.

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Below you will find the most complete apple variety listing on the web. Our Apple Variety listings includes edible apples and crab apples that have been planted in significant numbers in the United States

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