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Links 1 through 10 of 15 by Cory Edwards tagged highavailability

Federal IT managers find they must deploy new tactics for managing and securing their expanding virtual environments.

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Some industry experts have claimed that there are still business applications that should not run on virtual servers. This is surprising, as Gartner comments in a research note that “several interrelated trends are driving the movement toward decreased IT hardware assets using virtualization and cloud-enabled services.

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today's competitive business environment, your IT infrastructure must accommodate rapidly changing business needs and unforeseen problems with minimal impact on day-to-day operations. But this level of flexibility, scalability, and high availability can be expensive and difficult to deploy and maintain, especially for small and midsize businesses.

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market for highly available servers and high availability is growing, reflecting enterprise demand for solutions that strive to maintain business continuity. These solutions are becoming more important for operational viability, especially as organizations increase their adoption of virtualized computing solutions.

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A look at some of the business continuity considerations when implementing a virtualized computing environment.

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Many pundits and other folks like VMware's CEO Diane Greene have touted[1] virtualization as being the "cure" to disaster recovery, many for the past several years. Disaster recovery can be pretty reasonably viewed as being high-availability over distance, so it makes some sense to see how DR, HA and virtualization fit together. What's hype here, and what's real?

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Every year around this time people realize the old year is nearly in the history books and start thinking about the upcoming new 12 months. This invariably leads to all sorts of "predictions" about what's going to happen in any given area of interest.

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Life in Venice doesn't stop every time it floods. People roll up their trousers, pull on their wellies and walk to the grocer's, go to work or grab a vino with friends. And when it's all over, they mop the floor, dry the furniture, and go back to their pre-flood life. How do they do it? They choose not to have carpet or wooden flooring, keep themselves updated on water level and have a spare pair of boots right next to the door. This is called prevention. This article states that virtualization cannot be done overnight and gives a few paragraphs explaining why.

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Big, disruptive events like the BP oil spill, Hurricane Katrina and the California wildfires make the news, but it’s more often the smaller, unexpected disasters that wreck havoc on your company’s ability to function. The Small Business Administration and Agility Recovery Solutions, a Charlotte NC disaster recover company, recently launched an educational website called Prepare My Business, which offers resources to help small business owners recover from disasters. With a nasty hurricane season in the forecast, I was eager to speak with Agility’s CEO Bob Boyd for some tips on disaster preparedness for small companies. Here’s his advice: Assess your risk. Review your insurance coverage. Determine your critical business functions. Develop a communications strategy. Back up your data. Test Your Plan.

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Nasuni is a storage company founded last year by industry veterans who wanted to deliver a secure gateway to cloud storage that makes the cloud feasible for business users. Recently, Nasuni contacted us to discuss the top five considerations—as the company sees them—to keep in mind for effective disaster-recovery planning. Those considerations are downtime, data integrity, cost, simplicity and security. Data disaster recovery plans for safeguarding business data can include tape, disk, cloud technologies, or some combination of two or more systems. There is no universal disaster-recovery plan that suits all organizations, but the following considerations are intended to lay the groundwork for disaster planning and preparedness.

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