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Links 1 through 10 of 37 by Seth Anderson tagged green

Chicago is the first city to sign a contract to buy electric garbage trucks - residents will no longer hear their garbage (and hopefully recyclables too) being picked up because the trucks are so quiet. The city was recently lauded for its sustainable urban design.

Chicago signed a 5-year, $13.4 million contract with Motiv Power Systems, a start-up based in the San Francisco area, to buy 20 electric garbage trucks (it has a fleet of 600).

Motiv's technology is the first in the trucking market to use off-the-shelf batteries and motors that can be mixed and matched to fit the exact size of the electric truck needed. 

That design approach cuts operating costs 50% over eight years, Motiv says, pointing to its medium-duty truck, which costs $0.10 a mile to run.

Chicago's garbage trucks will have 10 battery packs and an electric motor that drives the hydraulics system. They weigh 52,000 lbs and have a range of more than 60 miles.

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Conservative New York Times columnist David Brooks argued today that the Obama administration's clean energy investments have been "a wasteful disappointment," citing a figure that his own paper called "outrageous" to downplay the number of jobs created in the clean energy sector.

…But the $90 billion figure -- which Mitt Romney cited in the first presidential debate -- has been repeatedly debunked, including by Brooks' own New York Times. As the Times' Matthew Wald explained after the first debate, not all the money went to renewable energy, not all of it has been spent, and much of it was authorized under the Bush administration:

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The Arakidas are among a growing number of Japanese seeking to live off the grid, or at least shrink the grid, by lowering the capacity of their circuit breakers—an extreme form of energy conservation that curbs the amount of electric current a household can draw before the fuse blows.Called Ampere Down, the movement started in 2007, when a group called the Sloth Club proposed trading in higher-rated breaker boxes for lower ones, as a way of protesting modern Japan's fast-paced, energy-hungry lifestyle and promoting one that is less amped-up.

The idea originated with a Hokkaido English teacher and renewable-energy activist named Peter Howlett, a Canadian who was casting about for ways to reduce the amount of power his family of five used. If enough people joined the cause, he reasoned, Japan's peak energy demand would go down.

When the Howletts first lowered their use of electricity to 20 amps from 30, they were tripping the breaker every day, Mr. Howlett recalls.

But after…

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The math does not add up for this statement that Romney directed at Obama.
The president’s 2013 budget called for elimination of tax breaks for oil subsidies, which the White House estimated at $4 billion per year. Dividing $90 billion -- the federal money that Romney claims went toward clean energy -- by $4 billion in breaks for the oil industry amounts to 22.5 years, not 50 years.
It’s also worth noting that the $90 billion was not “breaks,” but a combination of loans, loan guarantees and grants through the stimulus program, and they were spread out over several years rather than one, as Romney claimed.
Furthermore, not all of the money went to the “green energy world.” About $23 billion went toward “clean coal,” energy-efficiency upgrades, updating the electricity grid and environmental clean-up, largely for old nuclear weapons sites.

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LEED-bashing Reaches New Heights In Fast Companyby Lloyd Alter, Toronto  on 01. 7.11DESIGN & ARCHITECTURE   Image credit swanksalot via Creative Commons

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The name of Green Party gubernatorial candidate Rich Whitney is misspelled as Rich "Whitey" on electronic-voting machines in nearly two dozen wards -- about half in predominantly African-American areas -- and election officials said Wednesday the problem cannot be corrected by Election Day.

The misspelling turned up on touch-screen machines in 23 wards overall.

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" Nationally, food waste and spoilage amounts to losses in excess if $75 billion. In some sectors of agricultural production, waste can be as high as 40 percent. These autumnal fruits and vegetables — photographed being readied for compost by Flickr user swanksalot —  will get another shot at the table next season."

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"Just as Google’s CEO Eric Schmidt hinted over the past few months, Google is moving from managing the world’s information to managing your personal energy data. On Monday night Google tells us it is developing an online tool called “PowerMeter” that will allow users to monitor their home energy consumption. For now Google is testing the web-based software with Google employees, but the search engine giant is looking to partner with utilities and smart energy device makers and will eventually roll out the tool to consumers."

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"There are seven classes of plastics used in packaging applications. Type 7 is the catch-all "other" class, and some type 7 plastics, such as polycarbonate (sometimes identified with the letters "PC" near the recycling symbol) and epoxy resins, are made from bisphenol A monomer.[4] When such plastics are exposed to hot liquids, bisphenol A leaches out 55 times faster than it does under normal conditions, at up to 32 ng/hour.[81] Type 3 (PVC) can also contain bisphenol A as antioxidant in plasticizers.[4] Types 1 (PET), 2 (HDPE), 4 (LDPE), 5 (polypropylene), and 6 (polystyrene) do not use bisphenol A during polymerization or package forming"

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