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Links 1 through 10 of 36 by Julia Sparky tagged race+forcluelesswhitepeople

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I thought I was above the debate, rather than a part of it. I told oyceter that she could change her terms. And with that, I pretty clearly demonstrated that I was not above the debate. By trying to excuse all the white people, and by telling oyceter that the derailment was her fault because her definitions were being “misunderstood”, I was displaying my white privilege. I was part of the debate because not only can I not escape my white privilege, I wasn’t even trying to. My wise, unbiased words of wisdom were in fact profoundly influenced by my privilege, and I was too blinded by the sun glaring off my shiny white ass to see it. My belief that I could raise myself above the debate, ignore my own racial bias and somehow put myself in the middle, was influenced by my privilege. My belief that somehow a moderator was wanted, or needed, when nobody asked for my ignorant-ass opinion, especially oyceter, was privileged as fuck.

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"If you subscribe to a color-blind racial ideology, you don't think that race or racism exists, or that it should exist," Tynes said. "You are more likely to think that people who talk about race and racism are the ones who perpetuate it. You think that racial problems are just isolated incidents and that people need to get over it and move on. You're also not very likely to support affirmative action, and probably have a lower multi-cultural competence."

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It’s about silence when someone says something racist when we’re in a group, leaving me to stand alone and isolated as the sole “overly-emotional” POC if I choose to bring it up. It’s about the “Well, he didn’t mean it that way” that shows me that someone else’s comfort means so much more to you than my hurt.

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As a white person, I realized I had been taught about racism as something that puts others at a disadvantage, but had been taught not to see one of its corollary aspects, white privilege, which puts me at an advantage. ... I began to count the ways in which I enjoy unearned skin privilege and have been conditioned into oblivion about its existence.

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delux_vivens asked if I'd write about the experience of getting cultural consultants for Guardian of the Dead, as a way to encourage others to possibly avoid inadvertent racism in their own works when dealing with indigenous peoples.

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many liberal white people will not publicly and consciously express bias against blacks, but, because they have unconscious negative feelings about blacks, they will discriminate in subtle ways. This subtle and unconscious bias is what we mean when we refer to aversive racism.

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This is for all my peeps who need a little ammunition when confronted by anyone who thinks that watermelons and Black folks go together like, I don't know - rice and butter or who immediately tries to roll with, "But it was just a joke? Don't you have a sense of humor?"

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