Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 14 by Shaun Green tagged ideas

Be that as it may, stylistic evolution is important; without it we'd still be reading Cervantes. (Though I have to say, as somebody who reads a reasonable amount of SF I just don't recognise the genre the reviewer is describing: it seems to me to be much less stylistically conservative overall than any other, but perhaps I am reading the wrong books.) What concerns me more is this idea that genre fiction has to "address" or "speak to" issues - be they to do with post-20th Century resource scarcity or anything else. No, before you get ahead of me: this isn't one of those paeans to escapism. It has its virtues, but that's a conversation for another day. This is something more fundamental, to do with the nature of fiction and authorship, and it is this: professional writers of fiction are, probably, with the exception of movie stars and musicians, the least appropriately qualified people in the world to speak with any authority whatsoever about important 'issues', and yet we are expected to not only indulge them in their phony philosophizing and half-educated musings, but pay them for the pleasure of it - for the wonder of being enlightened by their ill-formed and incorrect opinions.

Share It With Others!

We people of the SF-reading ghetto have stumbled blinking into the future, and our dirty little secret is that we don't much like it. And so we retreat into the comfort zones of brass goggles and zeppelins (hey, weren't airships big in the 1910s-1930s? Why, then, are they such a powerful signifier for Victorian-era alternate fictions?), of sexy vampire-run nightclubs and starship-riding knights-errant. Opening the pages of a modern near-future SF novel now invites a neck-chillingly cold draft of wind from the world we're trying to escape, rather than a warm narcotic vision of a better place and time.

Share It With Others!

In a personal essay, Jenn Frank used 90s simulation Creatures to talk about her disconnection from motherhood – both physical and mental. It's worth your time if you haven't read it already and I'm not here to rip into her article – but I do want to pick up on one point.

There's an implication nestled in the final lines that her experience with Creatures tells her what she would be like as a mother. And zing! went my abstraction alarm.

Share It With Others!

When the singers hit Wales, astonishing things happened. The people of Wales made a heart connection with the Fisk kids, probably because the Welsh saw reflected in these black people their own vicious struggles with discrimination when dealing with England. The Welsh were thought to be a morally corrupt, unintelligent people, their language was demonized, stuff like that. I think their traditional religious practices were also frowned upon, but I can't remember that level of detail right now. When the Welsh saw these dignified black people fighting for the right to be taken on their own terms and viewed as human in a world that insisted they were not fully so, they saw themselves. By no means a wealthy populace, the people of Wales raised about $20,000 toward the construction fund for the Fisk University campus back in Tennessee. We're talking coal miners and farmers with plenty of their own problems coming up with that money.

Share It With Others!

No one at ESPN would talk or write about a lesbian athlete and unconsciously put forth that the woman in question would have a "finger in the dike." If an African American player was thought of as stingy, it's doubtful that anyone at the World Wide Leader would describe that person as "niggardly." They would never brand a member of a football team as a "Redskin" (wait, scratch that last one).

They wouldn't do it because a mental synapse would spark to life and signal their brain that in 2012, unless you're speaking at CPAC, that's just not okay. This collective synapse was forged by mass movements for black and LGBT liberation in this country that have forced a lot of people, particularly white straight men, to have a clue.

There simply hasn't been a similar national struggle built by people of Asian descent.

Share It With Others!

"As I work towards completing my own game, I’ve been thinking a lot about finishing projects in general. I’ve noticed that there are a lot of really talented developers out there that have trouble finishing games. Truthfully, I’ve left a long trail of unfinished games in my wake… I think everyone has. Not every project is going to pan out, for whatever reason. But if you find yourself consistently backing out of game projects that have a lot of potential, it could be worth taking a step back and examining why this happens." Good advice for any kind of creative project!

Share It With Others!

Jetse De Vries explores another potentially rich vein for optimistic SF - Islam.

Share It With Others!

"It’s been a hell of a long time since I did one of my writing tip round-ups… but I’ve been collecting links ever since. There are nearly fifty links in the following post, and I culled it down from close to a hundred so we just got the best and most pertinent."

Share It With Others!

Interesting post arguing for the value of the Singularity as a tool to understand the challenges of the 21st century.

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT