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Links 1 through 6 of 6 by Shaun Green tagged bias

I've heard this advice over and over and over at startup events, to the point that I got a little sick of hearing it. It's not wrong. Putting aside the fact that every single other startup in the world who heard this same advice before you is already out there frantically doing everything they can to hire all the best people out from under you and everyone else, it is superficially true. A company staffed by a bunch of people who don't care about their work and aren't good at their jobs isn't exactly poised for success. But in a room full of people giving advice to startups, nobody wants to talk about the elephant in that room: It doesn't matter how good the people are at your company when you happen to be working on the wrong problem, at the wrong time, using the wrong approach. Most startups, statistically speaking, are going to fail.

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So the evidence from the research is clear. The BBC tends to reproduce a Conservative, Eurosceptic, pro-business version of the world, not a left-wing, anti-business agenda.

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I merely anatomise this process to point out something of the nature of hegemonic political strategies in a capitalist democracy.  There is a network of institutions - media firms, polling companies, political parties, businesses, think-tanks, lobbies, and so on - all of which contribute to the policymaking process.  And yet all of them spend a great deal of time effectively claiming that they're just reporting on it and responding to it.  They treat policymaking as if it is something that voters do, by some curious osmosis, merely by having opinions and the chance to vote once every five years.  The role of polling in this is supposed to be as a friend of 'the democratic process', a facilitator, enabling real, meaningful communication between party and base, guaranteeing the representative link.  What generally happens is that they are used as raw material for shaping opinion, for conducting debates, for sidelining undesired opinions, and for producing opinions that are desired.  The term for this is, 'manufacturing consent'.

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Most of the western world thinks that Venezuela is some kind of dictatorship where Chávez has made people poorer.  They have no idea why he has been re-elected twice, each time by a larger majority.  This kind of reporting explains why they are so misinformed; sadly, it is all too typical.

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As the founder of Human Rights Watch, its active chairman for 20 years and now founding chairman emeritus, I must do something that I never anticipated: I must publicly join a militant wingnut circle-jerk with a mealy-mouthed and disingenuous hissy fit of epic proportions.

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"Like millions around the world, I am aghast at your decision not to air the Disasters Emergency Committee Gaza Crisis Appeal. During the recent onslaught on Gaza, many of us considered that the BBC reporting tacitly and too-uncritically accepted the Israeli narrative of events. However, with this refusal even to air a plea for help, you have gone a step further."

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