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Links 1 through 10 of 74 by Martin Griffiths tagged journalism

In order to present issues of risk, data, or science accurately, it is essential that media writers understand basic statistical and epidemiological principles, as well as the methods of scientific discovery. The press is most powerful when it goes beyond politics and morality to point out what science says, what it doesn't, and what it can't.

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The spectrum of health care news quality is broad – from Pulitzers to putrid. It soars to peaks of excellence on in-depth investigative projects and daily stories that still find time to evaluate evidence. But it also plummets to simplistic, slipshod stenography that quotes single, conflicted sources who exaggerate benefits while ignoring harms. Journalism churns out a daily flood of health news – usually more of the latter than the former type.

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What would it involve? A mixture of guest speakers and break out groups with an emphasis on the latter. We want to take the ‘unconference’ format and add in a strong element practical learning. This would allow us to really tackle some of the key issues facing young journalists and come up with ideas to solve them collectively. The key idea is that you come away with with some new skills or an idea you want to implement – something tangible.

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If health-risk information in newspapers is routinely misleading, there are real-world consequences

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Require all students to learn basic statistics, survey research and fundamental scientific methodology. The inability of journalists to understand what they’re reading is one of journalism’s — and society’s — major flaws.

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Most journalists do not like numbers. They can get in the way of a decent political dogfight, which provides far more reliable fun than cluttering up a news report with unwieldy statistics. Why change the way a story is interpreted by examining the numbers yourself when so many interest groups and politicians can do the numbers work for you?

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The EU Health Prize for Journalists 2011 will be awarded to stimulate high-quality journalism that raises awareness of issues related to healthcare and patients' rights.

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In this context, the European Journalism Centre in collaboration with the University of Amsterdam organises the first round table on data-driven journalism. The one day event brings together specialists in fields which intersect with data-driven journalism: data mining, data visualisation and multimedia storytelling to discuss the possibilities of this emerging field, examine and understand the needed tools and workflows, and spread the know-how for data-driven journalism.

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The College of Journalism's ongoing season 'Reporting Science' puts these questions under the microscope. In association with the Science Journalism Education programme at the Royal Statistical Society (RSS), the season includes debates, workshops and masterclasses with leading scientists, academics and journalists.

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Analysis of nearly 1,500 articles over five years finds pluses and minuses

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