Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 2087 Rob Lambert's Bookmarks

Share It With Others!

pandas is an open source, BSD-licensed library providing high-performance, easy-to-use data structures and data analysis tools for the Python programming language.

Share It With Others!

A simple javascript library to turn text into vector UML sequence diagrams. Heavily inspired by websequencediagrams.com, who offer a serverside solution. We use Jison to parse the text, and Raphaël to draw the image.

Share It With Others!

We hope to have clarified some URL myths and common mistakes. Short of clarifying them, making it obvious that it is not as simple as some people think will suffice. We have illustrated common mistakes in Java, and in the whole chain of a web application deployment. Now everyone is a URL expert and we hope never to see related bugs again.

Share It With Others!

I was asking around to see if anyone knew a good, short explanation of Ruby’s object and method dispatch system the other day, and the response from several people was, “no, you should write one.” So, here we are. I’m going to explain how Ruby’s object system works, including method lookup, inheritance, super calls, classes, mixins, and singleton methods. My understanding comes not from reading the MRI source but from reimplementing this system, once in JavaScript and once in Ruby. If you want to read a minimal but almost correct implementation that Ruby gist is not a bad place to start. Because I’ve not actually read the source, this will explain what happens logically but it might not be what actually happens inside of Ruby. It’s just a model you can use to understand things.

Share It With Others!

Written by Adrian Holovaty on May 20, 2013 On Friday, we migrated Soundslice from Heroku to direct use of Amazon Web Services (AWS). I'm very, very happy with this change and want to spread the word about how we did it and why you should consider it if you're in a similar position.

Share It With Others!

This webpage covers the space and time Big-O complexities of common algorithms used in Computer Science. When preparing for technical interviews in the past, I found myself spending hours crawling the internet putting together the best, average, and worst case complexities for search and sorting algorithms so that I wouldn't be stumped when asked about them. Over the last few years, I've interviewed at several Silicon Valley startups, and also some bigger companies, like Yahoo, eBay, LinkedIn, and Google, and each time that I prepared for an interview, I thought to msyelf "Why oh why hasn't someone created a nice Big-O cheat sheet?". So, to save all of you fine folks a ton of time, I went ahead and created one. Enjoy!

Share It With Others!

Let’s say you’re building your first API. Be it public, private, or some hybrid thereof, don’t be surprised if your first defect is date/time-related. Do not underestimate how much trouble you can get into when it comes to handling date and times. Here are some tips which might keep you out of this potential future.

Share It With Others!

Operating a business in the global market is not as trivial as it might seem, if you’ve never seen it through. Everyone not only speaks different languages and has different currencies (not to mention driving on the different sides of the road), but they also have different cultural norms. In many situations, we can merely provide raw values for dates and currency and avoid formatting. However, when content includes localizable information, especially dates and currencies, display formatting needs to be sensitive to the localized culture. If you’re considering making the jump off of your own soil to the rest of the globe, hopefully this will give you some insights.

Share It With Others!

The following post is a comprehensive summary of the developer-facing changes coming in Java 8. This next iteration of the JDK is currently scheduled for general availability in September 2013. At the time of this writing, Java 8 development is still very much in progress. Language features and APIs may still change. I'll do my best to keep this document up to date.

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT