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Links 1 through 10 of 165 by Roberta Wedge tagged MaryWollstonecraft

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{On a small information board:} The mural in Polygon Street, NW1 depicts many historical London figures and deliberately uses various artistic influences. The diagram above, and the key below identify the main ones.

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Professor Sharon Ruston (University of Salford) will discuss Mary Wollstonecraft and science: during the two-year period of the composition and publication of her Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792), Mary Wollstonecraft, the mother of Mary Shelley and early advocate of women’s rights, read and reviewed a number of important works of natural history for a periodical called the Analytical Review. Wollstonecraft is not known for her interest in science but in this talk Professor Ruston will show that reading these texts helped her to formulate her feminist theory. Close attention to her reviews of natural history reveal her developing thought on issues of equality, education, and what it means to be human. On a more general note, Wollstonecraft’s reviews show that in the late eighteenth century, people were aware of the political purpose of scientific writings.

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Mary Wollstonecraft wrote Vindication of the Rights of Women in Store Street; the poet Christina Rossetti was born in Charlotte Street and in 1888, Agnes Bertha Marshall created the first ice cream cornet at her cookery school in Mortimer Street.

Situated bang in the centre of town, Fitzrovia is an area of London which has been home to more than its fair share of notable characters. Marsha Rowe, co-author of Characters of Fitzrovia, joins Jenni to recount their stories.
Characters of Fitzrovia by Mike Pentelow & Marsha Rowe (Chatto and Windus, ISBN: 0701173149, £25.00).

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Last evening's start of season members BBQ paid tribute to inspirational women who have made a significant - and all too often overlooked - contribution to 'herstory'. To this end, each of our participants came as a woman featured in Judy Chicago's internationally acclaimed 1970s art installation, The Dinner Party.

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I recently came across two oddly similar stories about Englishwomen in Paris. Both women came to the city to work, both became pregnant with men they met in Paris, both had baby girls while living with these men. But the men, absorbed in their work, grew distant. The women found solace in writing; their work was published. Both ended up meeting and marrying other men and having a second child by these husbands.

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Three young actors are rehearsing a play based on the lives of three seminal women authors - Jane Austen, Fanny Burney and Mary Wollstonecroft. While they try to portray aspects of the authors' lives, they find themselves exploring aspects of their own lives, and what it means to be a woman in 2005. Written and directed by Janet van Eeden, this third in her Savage Trilogy (the first two were A Savage from the Colonies about the life of Katherine Mansfield, and Oviri, The Savage Civilian, about the life of Paul Gauguin) explores the lives of the three authors through the eyes of the students who are putting on a play about the authors. As it turns out, their director has to miss the first rehearsal because her child is sick. The actors have to make a start on their own, much to the swottish Genevieve’s disgust.

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In Rebel Daughters, Todd picks up a thread of the Wollstonecraft story - the unhappy year in which she was governess to the daughters of the Earl of Kingston, then Lord Kingsborough, in Mitchelstown, Ireland - and weaves it into an account of a dysfunctional family's role in the 1798 Irish rebellion.Lord Kingsborough's family makes the Ewings of Dallas look like the Waltons. .. ...Mary Wollstonecraft comes into the picture when Lady Kingsborough, disturbed by her daughter Margaret's bookish, thoughtful, contemptuous nature and by Margaret's younger sister, the sensitive Mary - who "wept herself sick" when forced to spend time with her mother - looked for a governess of "good morals and firm principles who would not sleep with her husband and who could control and refine the girls, teach them standards as well as facts".

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