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Links 1 through 10 of 752 by Ramit Sethi tagged psychology

Wow, brutally honest post from parent who raised a bully daughter. They move away to change her surroundings. Change your surroundings and you'll change your behavior.

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After one year, as we recently reported in the journal Health Affairs, employees randomly assigned to a control group that received no financial incentive had no change in their weight. But employees who were offered a $550 premium reduction didn’t lose weight either. One reason that these rewards were ineffective was that they were provided too far in the future. If you lose weight today you may not receive any reward until next year. Next year is a long way off, particularly if there is a cookie in front of you right now. (Some methods work better -- see article.)

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Stanford physician/epidemiologist writes about how educating people is highly overrated in behavioral change. Yet governments/companies continue to believe it. UGH

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They were randomly assigned to four groups: A "gain incentive" paid $1.40 for each day the goal was achieved. A "lottery incentive" offered the possibility of a daily $50 reward that could be collected only if the goal had been met the previous day. A "loss incentive" allocated $42 a month up front but deducted $1.40 for each day the goal was not reached. (The dollar amounts for each type of incentive were designed to be roughly equal.) A control group received daily feedback from a smartphone app, as did everyone else. Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/health/sportsmedicine/20160216_The_takeaway_that_could_make_you_exercise_more.html#6KEx22Cq1jaHyfCM.99

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Most nudges were supported, although opt-out defaults for organ donations were opposed in both samples. “System 1” nudges (e.g., defaults and sequential orderings) were viewed less favorably than “System 2” nudges (e.g., educational opportunities or reminders). System 1 nudges were perceived as more autonomy threatening, whereas System 2 nudges were viewed as more effective for better decision making and more necessary for changing behavior. People with greater empathetic concern tended to support both types of nudges and viewed them as the “right” kind of goals to have. Individualists opposed both types of nudges, and conservatives tended to oppose both types. Reactant people and those with a strong desire for control opposed System 1 nudges. To see whether framing could influence attitudes, we varied the description of the nudge in terms of the target (Personal vs. Societal) and the reference point for the nudge (Costs vs. Benefits). Empathetic people were more supportive when framin

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This video prompted a 20% boost in Weight Watchers share price

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BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Some obese subjects repeatedly fail to lose weight even though they report restricting their caloric intake to less than 1200 kcal per day. RESULTS: Total energy expenditure and resting metabolic rate in the subjects with diet resistance (group 1) were within 5 percent of the predicted values for body composition, and there was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 in the thermic effects of food and exercise. Low energy expenditure was thus excluded as a mechanism of self-reported diet resistance. In contrast, the subjects in group 1 underreported their actual food intake by an average (+/- SD) of 47 +/- 16 percent and overreported their physical activity by 51 +/- 75 percent. Although the subjects in group 1 had no distinct psychopathologic characteristics, they perceived a genetic cause for their obesity, used thyroid medication at a high frequency, and described their eating behavior as relatively normal

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Diners order significantly more food and drink when served by an overweight waiter or waitress, according to a recently published study.

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Sometimes I think LL folks have actually gotten themselves to believe this stuff. I think some of them REALLY believe they want sex as much as HL folks, and it's just the stress, the headache, the dishwasher being improperly loaded that gets in the way. If things were perfect they'd want sex more, it's just that stuff getting in the way, not that they don't want sex as much as you. Lastly, without getting into numbers of partners where there's inequity on how the genders are treated, a high sex drive is a typically attractive trait in either sex. No woman says "I hope my future husband never wants to touch me" and no man says "I am hoping to find a totally frigid woman to make my wife". So, it probably feels really bad to admit they don't have much sex drive (if that's indeed the case). I'm not justifying this, but people lie to themselves and others to avoid facing unpleasant truths constantly. This is not unique.

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