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Links 1 through 4 of 4 by Latoya Peterson tagged womanism

"Just as the primary and high school education system includes black history month as an additive in a faux attempt at inclusivity, so too are the works of black women occasionally intermingled within women's studies curriculum. Including the works of black women occasionally in a women's studies program is not inclusive; it simply mirrors all of the previous modes of pedagogy that marginalises students of colour, while reifying white hegemony. In fact, the very existence of separate classes dealing with the works of black women, indigenous women and Latina women signify a failure to fully integrate the work of women of colour in all academic endeavours. Despite protestations, the ghettoisation of the work of women of colour too often frames white womanhood as the monolithic norm."

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"[Presenter] Owens’s suggestion that Hip-Hop could replace the theoretical models of Freud and Foucault opened the audience up to the idea that this cultural and musical medium could have academic relevance. While Freud and Foucault have been integral to the development of a white feminist’s discourse that articulates the dynamics of their systemic oppression, her argument contends that their theories are only accessible to the privileged and educated (white). Hip-Hop, however, is presented as a cultural space that is ideally suited to combating the subjugation of Black women and serves as an instrument of change and resistance. When the enthusiastic applause and boisterous shouts subsided, the audience lingered, digesting the implications of Owens’s argument. Her presentation left a lasting impression: Hip-Hop can be a viable and credible means for academic study and the advancement of Black feminist theory."

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This is an interesting interview with Alice Walker. "If I write about Palestinians being deprived of water and land, of Aung San Suu Kyi and the precious instruction she is capable of giving us—not only about democracy but also about morality—if I write about violence and war, collards and chickens, I can connect with others who care about these things. Hopefully, together we can move the discussion of survival, with grace and justice and dignity, forward. We will need to know many different kinds of things to survive as a species worth surviving."

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"So greatly are we discounted that when men rail against the critique of women, they routinely ignore the womanist perspective. We are understood as so irrelevant that countering our position is deemed unimportant. All women are lumped into one group as though we experience gender oppression in the same way. To be erased from existence is worse than the vicious vitriolic attacks that patriarchy aims at feminists. Feminists are attacked because even at the most basic level patriarchy recognizes a threat to its existence whereas; women of color are already understood as conquered and colonized beings."

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