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Links 1 through 5 of 5 by Latoya Peterson tagged whitewashing

"I tend to side with Isis here: the idea that technical limitations prevent making a more accurate representation of a dark-skinned doll is…sketchy, to say the least, and makes me think PBS needs to partner with a better toy design firm. And the choices about what the Princess Presto doll should look like in doll form put PBS in the position of appearing to think that a mixed-race character needs to be whitened to sell. PBS’s dolls exist in a marketplace where we’ve seen controversies about African American dolls being literally valued less than White dolls, and whatever their supposed reasons, it’s hard to get around the fact that all of the choices made in the name of aesthetics added up to a doll that looks awfully White."

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"But The Social Network is a movie based on real people. Mr. Narendra is of Indian descent. In an interview, he said he was 'initially surprised to see a white actor play him on screen.'

"A Google search turns up a picture of Mr. Narendra next to Mr. Minghella. The differences are striking. Mr. Minghella, son of the legendary director Anthony Minghella, is significantly shorter and he appears to weigh a fair bit less. He also looks significantly lighter-skinned than Mr. Narendra.

"Which brings up another issue. Many photographs not related to The Social Network show Mr. Minghella as a rather pale young man. But in pictures of him as Mr. Narendra, he appears darker. There’s another one that puts all the cast members together with their real-life personae; in this one, Messrs. Narendra and Minghella appear to have about the same complexion.

"Was make-up used to darken Mr. Minghella for the part? A spokesman for Sony Pictures said in an email it was not."

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"Not all the examples are white celebs. We are given Alex Rodriguez whose parents are Dominican and the legendary Joan Baez, daughter of a Scottish mother and Mexican father. But, I wonder would the inclusion of 'successful' people of color, specifically women of color and even more specifically Latinas work as proof of how safe the children of immigrants are if there weren’t European immigrants and their children on the list? After all the false debate around the 14th amendment is not built around the birthrate of immigrant Norwegians . It’s about Latina women, more specifically Mexican women and their children. Women like Cirila Baltazar Cruz and children like her daughter Ruby and young adults like those fighting for the DREAM Act."

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"Lee noted that the 'Airbender' controversy has motivated TV fans to ditch the stereotypical couch potato slouch and campaign for fairness. 'I think it's been really empowering,' she said. 'It's an opportunity for fans to channel their love and energy for the animated series into activism.' But Lee is aware that a surge in interest doesn't mean overnight change.
"'We're going to continue to keep an eye on Hollywood,' she said. 'It doesn't stop with 'Airbender,' unfortunately.'"  

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"First of all, the whitewashing is ridiculous. It’s embarrassing from the first few minutes, which shows a plucky young white boy (Dastan as a child) standing up to the cruel Persian guards who beat another street orphan for getting in the way of a horse. Naturally, this act of heroism causes the kindly King to adopt him as a son (in addition to his two biological sons, although their mother is never mentioned at all).

The only people of color in the film are villains, except for Dastan’s plucky sidekick, who is killed off in the first 15 minutes and immediately forgotten about. (There are some white villains, but there are no people of color who are heroes throughout the entire film.)"

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