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Links 1 through 5 of 5 by Latoya Peterson tagged via:whenfangirlsattack

"[J]ust as animanga is seen as an open safe space for females, it (the English-speaking corners) is also seen as an open safe space for Asian-Americans, other English-speaking Asians and to a lesser extent other People of Color (hello media written about Asians by Asians! hello culture and characters with which they can identify! hello media not about white people!). Or it's supposed to. It is made unsafe by the rampant of fetishism and exoticization of Asian culture and people by mostly white animanga fans. Ignorance does not equal innocence. I find it's telling that in any discussions about the attractions of popular Asian media among white fans, especially one centering around the problematic aspects of it, even white fans who professed to be self-aware fall into the trapping of Western males = masculine, Asian males = androgynous. Or at least don't understand the irony of it all."

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In the 1970s, amidst rapid social changes along racial and gender lines, the comic book industry began to incorporate black superheroes into their comics. Readers of the era had mixed reactions. Some objected to this darker-skinned presence in their all-white superhero fantasies, while others bemoaned depictions that were stereotypes at best and racist at worst. But how could the depictions be otherwise? These characters were borne out of the imaginations of men whose understanding of black life lacked form, insight or nuance. And if that character happened to be both black and female, the results were doubly insulting because the writers' understanding of women's issues also left much to be desired. Nowhere were those combined deficiencies more apparent than in the figure of Nubia, "the black Wonder Woman."

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"Women don’t just like a story because it is about women. We like stories that are well-written and well-developed, just like anyone else. There’s no need for Lifetime comics."

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"If images of women in comic books persist in sexualization, then the great storylines will fade away, just like it did in the late 1940’s during the “headlight comic books.” They will be nothing short than meaningless."

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