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Links 1 through 4 of 4 by Latoya Peterson tagged via:shahryarr

"Why does remix culture, a recent and largely synthetic idea, get more coverage, attention, and defense than the enduring and organic mixtape culture? Remix culture as epitomized by its DJ poster-boy serves as a whitewashed screen for a mixtape culture whose obscenity, violence, and blackness some academics and activists could not defend without blushing.
The obvious answer is race. Mash-up DJs tend to be whiter than mixtape rappers, and it could be that the poster boy for a para-academic intellectual property movement has to be, in the minds of those in charge, a certain color. 

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"Then there's the issue of race. The TV series was, quite rightly, criticised for rarely featuring non-Caucasian characters. The first film's nervy response to this was to include a black character, but as Carrie's assistant, played by Jennifer Hudson, who is cravenly grateful for Carrie's designer cast-offs, and then returns in the end to the south, where black people belong. The second film goes even further, because King sends the characters to Abu Dhabi. Not since 1942's Arabian Nights has orientalism been portrayed so unironically. All Middle Eastern men are shot in a sparkly light with jingly jangly music just in case you didn't get that these dusky people are exotic and different." 

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"And the West (here, the U.S.) seemed more than happy to overlook its own social shortcomings and issues and use Japan as a forum to work out its own neuroses and fantasies.

"Because the West could always point to things it did not understand and simply say smugly, 'Boy, Japan is so weird! Japanese people are wacky!'"

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"I became curious about the dark side – racial images used in food advertising – and it seems I'm not the only one.  But what's more amazing is that all three of these icons are still found on packaging today.

"It's just in the larger historical context – slavery, lynchings, beat-downs in Birmingham – that the enduring trend seems, uh, tasteless. "

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