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Links 1 through 10 of 89 by Latoya Peterson tagged transracialadoption

"One result has been the creation of “rainbow congregations” across the country, like the congregation Moore helps pastor in Louisville, Highview Baptist. An active adoption ministry has brought 140 adopted children into the congregation in the past five years. These children don’t recognize the flags of their home countries, Moore proudly noted at a 2010 conference, but they can all sing 'Jesus Loves Me.'"

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"Thirteen Korean adoptees regained their South Korean citizenship on Tuesday but didn’t have to forfeit their foreign nationality in the first case of its kind to happen since a revised immigration law went into effect, the Justice Ministry said.

"The revised immigration law, which took effect on Jan. 1, allows foreign individuals, including those who have valued expertise and were adopted before they came of age, to hold multiple citizenship if they make a vow to not exercise their rights as foreign nationals while in South Korea."

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"And all the queries that naturally arise upon learning that his parents are black—Did you struggle with your identity? Did you ever feel like you didn’t belong? Do you consider yourself black or Asian?—are quietly shut down with answers that make the questioner feel slightly foolish for the asking.

“'I grew up not trying to identify, but naturally identifying with the people around me, the African American culture,' says Mack. 'From before I can remember, I was surrounded by African American people. They were the ones I saw every day, they were my family, the people I lived with, who loved me, took care of me and played with me.'”

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"I often find other people’s conceptions of culture lacking. Culture is not merely owned by brown people. We are not the only ethnic people. Our ethnicity, our heritage and our culture are not add-ons.

"Culture is not a knickknack you pick up on vacation. Culture is not the display of an object or a people. Culture is not inherently contained in things. Culture is not a toe-dip and a quick retreat. Culture is not looking at people. Culture is not an optional yearly visit or an afterthought.

"The proper descriptive term for these would be cultural tourism. Not culture."

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A review of Wo Ai Ni Mommy. "The parents seemed woefully unprepared, especially given the fact that they were adopting an older child. They did not appear to have learned even rudimentary Chinese phrases. And yet the adoptive mother is unsympathetic when her new daughter balks at language drills, saying it’s “too hard.” In a voiceover, the mother says something like “She’s thinking this is too hard, why don’t you learn Chinese?” Yet it does not seem to have occurred to the adoptive mother that perhaps she might have tried. [...] The mom badgers the child to Sit up! and learn her lessons. And this segues into a truly awful segment where the adoptive mother lectures the girl about how she has another Chinese kid at home who speaks English and how the mother loves her. And she asks the little girl if she is ugly because she’s a white person."

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"My adoptive parents were great parents and I'm fortunate that we still have a good relationship. However, having a good adoptive home did not erase the losses I've suffered. There is nothing that my American, middle-class upbringing could have done to erase the loss of my Korean family and culture and language. I am tired of this prevailing assumption that as long as the adoptive parents are "good" ones, the adoptee won't ever feel loss and grief. I'm really exasperated at this notion that a "well-adjusted adoptee" is one who never questions adoption loss, who never feels sadness or grief, or who never goes through an identity crisis over who s/he is and where s/he belongs. I hate that we are constantly told that we should 'get over it.'"

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"- He says, "There isn't a racist bone in my body."
- Jesse says he plans on being around the son Sandra is adopting ... the son he had planned to adopt with her."

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"[An adoptive parent] complained that I did not give her one concrete suggestion for how she might go about creating relationships with people who shared her daughter’s ethnicity. And then she begged me to tell her just one thing that she should do.

So I told her to move to a diverse neighborhood.

It’s not like adoptive parents haven’t heard this before. Prospective adopters have access to a wealth of information provided by adult adopted persons. Some of the transracial adoptees are in their fifties now. Over and over we hear the same concrete suggestion for white adoptive parents of children of color:

Move.

Yet overwhelmingly the narrative we hear from white adoptive parents not only ignores this advice, but assumes the opposite is true. It goes beyond simple ignorance, however. It posits the all-white environment as the unspoken norm. Like whiteness, this goes unremarked upon and unnoticed."

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Such encounters are rare for the thousands of American families who have adopted Chinese children. But increasingly these families are making the return journey to China, not merely as tourists climbing the Great Wall and steeping their daughters (and they are almost all girls) in Chinese culture, but as detectives trying to unravel the most elusive mystery of all: Who is my child?
Who are her biological parents, and where are they from? Is she Han Chinese or a member of one of the many ethnic minorities? Does she have a biological sibling? And, most important, how did she come to be abandoned and referred for adoption?

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"I think there are three systems for psychiatric treatment of children. There's one for parents with money that's described in the article. There's another one for parents without money, where parents don't have the resources to get the right diagnoses, treatments or medications. And then the one for foster care kids, in which they're both underdiagnosed and undertreated AND overdiagnosed and overmedicated. It's the worst of both worlds."

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