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Links 1 through 7 of 7 by Latoya Peterson tagged nationality

"Race is constructed radically differently across cultural contexts, and it’s often quite a shock to see how much. For example, we were having a conversation a couple of weeks ago about the case of Tarran Betterridge, an Aboriginal Australian woman who was denied a job because her skin tone was considered too light for her to be a proper Aboriginal representative. I realised that I would really have to go to some lengths to explain to you, a primarily US audience, how Indigenous Australian identities are constructed: a combination of ancestry, community acceptance and self-identification. From what I’ve gauged, in the United States, skin colour seems to figure a lot more dominantly in how race is constructed. And I’ve been thinking about how vital the particular history and cultural forms of a context are for constructing racial identity. "

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In DC, October 27th. - LDP

"This program will screen the documentary film, The Great Pinoy Boxing Era (Corky Pasquil and Agrafino Edralin) and host a panel discussion and demonstration on Filipino martial arts. The Great Pinoy Boxing Era is an insightful portrayal of the Filipino men who came to the U.S. not only as farm laborers and as prize-winning boxers during the 1920s and 1930s. The film will be followed by a presentation from Professor Linda España-Maram along with presentations and demonstrations by internationally renowned martial artists Dan Inosanto and Rosie Abriam. Gem Daus of the University of Maryland-College Park will serve as moderator."

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"M: Don't say gaijin. Say Gaikokujin. It's more polite. Jake's a gaijin.

S: Yeah, I forget sometimes. What's with all the fucking gaikokujin in Kabukicho anyway?

K: Internationalization. The world's a smaller place. The Nigerians? They marry Japanese chicks. They get a permanent visa. They stay. The cops can't get rid of them and they're good at steering customers into shady places. The young Japanese punks we hire, they give up, they don't browbeat drunks into bringing business to our establishments. They got no backbone. The Nigerians are aggressive. They can make good touts. By the way, Adelstein, usually when we say gaijin we mean non-Asian foreigners like you and the Nigerians. Not the Chinese or the Koreans.

S: Yeah, Koreans are chosenjin, not gaijin."

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"Direct language from the casting call states that the casting crew is looking for “Persian-Americans who rule the Hollywood nightlife and own Beverly Hills.” Furthermore, another description reads, “At least 21 years old, appear younger than thirty and are outrageous, outspoken and a proud Persian-American,” and, “[If your life is] ‘all about Gucci, Gabbana, Cavalli and Cristal’ or if buying anything ‘from BMWs and Bugatis, to Mercedes and Movado–money is no object.’” The use of the word “outrageous” and the emphasis on nightlife and Beverly Hills is alarming as are the values the call associates with Iranians. It is also important to point out that a majority of Iranian-Americans do not embrace those values."

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"A New Jersey medical student is suing his school for discrimination for the way they treated him after he described himself as a "white, African, American." Which, as a Mozambique-born Caucasian immigrant, he technically is. But he may also be an asshat, as the school suspended him for continuing to use the expression after being told others found it offensive."

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"To what extent does national pride condition your response to current international events? Do we really need to be internationally pitted against one another in events like the Miss Universe Pageant, the Olympics, and World Championships of any kind?"

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"The riffs on nationalities go something like this: The Chinese do not invent anything; they only copy. Italians design beautiful shoes, but who ever heard of a Tuscan computer programmer? Russians dominate chess, yet cannot seem to engineer a children’

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