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Links 1 through 7 of 7 by Latoya Peterson tagged multicultural

"Can we rewrite our own dictionary and dialogue so that it works for 2012 and beyond? And can we do it without resorting to culinary cop-outs like the melting pot or the salad bowl? Or quaint crutches like 'a patchwork quilt' or a 'collage'? Can we put a time limit on the notion of an 'emerging market' -- akin to how long you can use the words "new and improved" in advertising. Haven't we already emerged? Or, are we afraid to come out for fear that upon fully emerging, we will be considered to be blended in -- like frozen yogurt once it melts and you smoosh it all about?"

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"The multiculturalism of fact is rooted in considerable achievements of who we have become. The multiculturalism of fiction is rooted in the fear of what has never been."

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"Equally importantly, we must not take for granted what we have in common, but work hard to ensure that all citizens recognise themselves in our shared concept of citizenship – imaginatively shaped by our sense of who we are, where we are coming from and where we are going. An out-of-date national story, for example, alienates new communities, who want to be written into the narrative backwards as well as forward. Multiculturalism is incomplete and one-sided without a continual remaking of national identity."

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"Once a purely black concept, its new home is a multicultural America determined to celebrate diverse histories, experiences and cultures. Part of Kwanzaa's embrace by multicultural America is self-serving. Whereas black power uses Kwanzaa to connect black Americans with the continent of Africa, multicultural America uses Kwanzaa to sell products and consumer goods. Whereas black power expected Kwanzaa to liberate African-Americans, multicultural America has tried to use Kwanzaa as evidence of racial diversity and black inclusion.

We should applaud Kwanzaa's growth in American society, but we should also remain aware of a cautionary tale so often associated with holidays. Too much variation and too many usages will cause Kwanzaa to lose its original purpose. Just ask its neighbor, Christmas."

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"Through the power of diverse narratives, the filmmakers also hope to dispel various misconceptions of hafu identity. '(Identity) is really hard to analyze and categorize. That's why narratives are the best tool to get the stories out, for people to decide for themselves from the 'real world,' the people being interviewed,' says Lise."

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"The article follows the prom adventures of high school seniors who came to Brooklyn from locales like Senegal, Venezuela, Tibet, Haiti, Poland and Gabon (one was a nomadic yak herder until age 12)."

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"He’s a living symbol of how America looks at a biracial kid,” Leo Butler, director of diversity at NFA, said. “To people, he’s black, period.”

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