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Links 1 through 3 of 3 by Latoya Peterson tagged mexico/usborderdeaths

"Hester's portrait forms part of an exhibition depicting 200 of the hundreds of women who have been murdered or declared missing in the Mexican border city of Ciudad Juarez since the early 1990s.

"Over the past five years, Ciudad Juarez has been in the news for the violence and havoc caused by Mexico's drugs cartels.

"But the murder of these women is largely unrelated and pre-dates the country's drugs war.

"Because almost all the women are 'extremely poor' they are 'seen as inconsequential,' according to Tamsyn Challenger."

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"Rodarte's MAC collection, which launches on September 15, is inspired by Mexico's colors and culture, and the products are named accordingly. For example, one pink blush is called Quinceañera, while a sheer white lipstick is called Ghost Town. However, the frosty pink nail polish called Juarez isn't sitting well with blogger the Frisky, who finds it "tasteless":

"'Why’s it tasteless? Juarez is an impoverished Mexican factory town notorious for the number of women between the ages of 12 and 22 who have been raped and murdered with little or no response from police.'"

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Imperial County's pauper's cemetery [is] a dusty field dotted with about 900 concrete markers the size of bread loaves. Each was stamped with numbers or the name "John Doe." Several hundred marked the final resting place of Mexican and other Latin American migrants who've died walking across the desert or drowned trying to cross the nearby All-American Canal.

[John Carlos] Frey, a 46-year-old filmmaker, blames the U.S. government for their deaths. In all, some 6,000 people have died crossing the Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California borders with Mexico since 1994, according to human-rights groups. About 500 more die every year...In his new documentary film, "The 800 Mile Wall," Frey says this tragedy is the foreseeable result of a policy that sealed off urban crossing routes, driving migrants into the desert.

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