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Links 1 through 10 of 17 by Latoya Peterson tagged mexico

"A growing body of evidence suggests that a mix of developments — expanding economic and educational opportunities, rising border crime and shrinking families — are suppressing [undocumented-immigrant] traffic as much as economic slowdowns or immigrant crackdowns in the United States.

"Douglas S. Massey, co-director of the Mexican Migration Project at Princeton, an extensive, long-term survey in Mexican emigration hubs, said his research showed that interest in heading to the United States for the first time had fallen to its lowest level since at least the 1950s. 'No one wants to hear it, but the flow has already stopped,' Mr. Massey said, referring to illegal traffic. 'For the first time in 60 years, the net traffic has gone to zero and is probably a little bit negative.'”

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"But Napa is taking a different approach, providing affordable basic necessities for migrant workers — food, shelter and support — regardless of whether they are here legally or not.

"The effort was born of compassion and practicality. Without migrant labor, most of it from Mexico, the wine producers in Napa would be hard pressed to fill a carafe, much less the valley’s nine million annual cases."

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"Meanwhile, the booming Latin population north of the border brings these same bands to the United States. As well as Caifanes, alternative Mexican groups such as Cafe Tacvba, Molotov and Nortec Collective all pack venues from coast to coast.

“'Many Mexicans are in the U.S. out of necessity and have a hunger for their culture,' Hernandez said. 'In the concerts, I see a very strong energy. The crowd expresses a search for identity, a catharsis.'”

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"'How did we acquire that picture of the lazybones snoozing under the cactus?' said Guadalupe Loaeza, a columnist for Reforma newspaper and author of books about the foibles of Mexico’s rich and famous. 'We know that life is hard every day in our country. That you cannot work one job. You have to have three. You have to work even on the weekends.'”

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"Part of the problem is the Homeland Security Department assigned the job of interviewing and screening unaccompanied children to Customs and Border Patrol officers, who lack child welfare expertise and are not getting needed training, the advocates said A form used for questioning children about whether they want to go home does not make clear that the children will be detained in a shelter for children, rather than a jail or immigration detention facility, advocates said."

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"'The migrants were abducted in highly questionable circumstances,' Ms. Pillay said, adding that Mexico needed “to ascertain whether or not any state officials, including those working for the state-owned train operator, were complicit with the criminal organization that carried out the abductions and extortion.”

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"These numbers, which came from the Mexican agency, Instituto Nacional de Migración (INM), further state that in between January and November of 2010, there were 439,898 deportation cases of which 19,296 were children, and out of the children, 3,653 were identified as female.

This has huge implications in terms of protecting Mexican minors, across genders, from human trafficking, abuse, and sexual assault. How many of these unaccompanied children are the victim of violence, at the hands of the either state entity, Mexico and/or the United States? The article of course refers to the possibility of abuse at the hands of the narcos, but there is often crossover regarding who works in an “official state” capacity and who works in the extra legal drug industry."

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"Hester's portrait forms part of an exhibition depicting 200 of the hundreds of women who have been murdered or declared missing in the Mexican border city of Ciudad Juarez since the early 1990s.

"Over the past five years, Ciudad Juarez has been in the news for the violence and havoc caused by Mexico's drugs cartels.

"But the murder of these women is largely unrelated and pre-dates the country's drugs war.

"Because almost all the women are 'extremely poor' they are 'seen as inconsequential,' according to Tamsyn Challenger."

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"Last week, an immigration judge granted Reyes a form of asylum that allows her to stay in the U.S. based on the persecution she suffered as a transgender woman in Mexico.

"The Board of Immigration Appeals withheld her removal from the U.S. after determining the Mexican government would not protect her from abuse if she was deported.

"U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services does not keep statistics on the numbers of transgender immigrants granted asylum. But Large said the relief Reyes got is rare for a Mexican national because some immigration judges think there is tolerance for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community in Mexico.

"Same-sex marriage is allowed in Mexico City, and many gay tourists flock to beach resorts throughout the country, leading to the misconception that the country is welcoming, said Large, who argues that pockets of intolerance abound in rural Mexico."

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"Yet, overall, residents know little about the unique heritage of their region. Many rural areas offer little to no education about black history in Mexico, despite its visible presence.

“'I’ve never thought that much about it,' said David Perez, a student near San Jose del Progreso. 'It's true, a lot of us are blacks near here, but we don’t know why. It's not something that we talk about.'

“'No one has the mentality that they are black here,' said Norga, 'they don’t celebrate it … There is no one on this coast who knows anything about the history of it.'

"This break in the chain of passing along traditions causes some to question whether connections to this culture will slip away altogether. Outside of the Costa Chica region, Afro-Mexicans are rarely seen, and knowledge on the topic is generally nonexistent around Mexico, despite the major role slavery played in the early colonial years."

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