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Links 1 through 5 of 5 by Latoya Peterson tagged literatureofcolour

Say that, Sherman Alexie!--AJP "When some cultural critics fret about the 'ever-more-appalling' YA books, they aren’t trying to protect African-American teens forced to walk through metal detectors on their way into school. Or Mexican-American teens enduring the culturally schizophrenic life of being American citizens and the children of illegal immigrants. Or Native American teens growing up on Third World reservations. Or poor white kids trying to survive the meth-hazed trailer parks. They aren’t trying to protect the poor from poverty. Or victims from rapists.

"No, they are simply trying to protect their privileged notions of what literature is and should be. They are trying to protect privileged children. Or the seemingly privileged."

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"Charles Montgomery thinks Korean literature could be on the brink of a popularity breakthrough.

"But when he looked on Wikipedia he was disappointed to find a dearth of information about it. Major authors were overlooked: Gong Ji-young’s page was a 60-word stub; Park Wan-suh had no page at all.

"That’s a disastrous situation in an age when if something isn’t on Wikipedia it doesn’t exist."

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"Butler opened doors I'd been taught to believe permanently locked: My inner Civil Rights Movement found a brilliant voice in the imaginings of a lonely, bookish girl from Pasadena. Her stories opened up galaxies of imagination. She taught me that the loftiest reaches of the human story are colorless... free. I've been writing the kinds of stories I want to write since then; peopling my stories with characters who do and don't look like me: empowered, inspired -- the way millions of readers have been inspired to dream. Without limit.

"We all have Octavia Butler to thank for that."

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Racializens, what are your thoughts on this?--AJP "At present, however, a literature insisting that the problem of the 21st century remains the problem of the color line paradoxically obscures the economic and political problems facing many black Americans, unless those problems can be attributed to racial discrimination. If the nation's black citizens are suffering largely for the same reasons its white citizens are suffering, then that is a problem about which such politics has nothing to say. In the world we inhabit, discrimination stands out most blatantly as the problem to be addressed when you've got a lot of life's other problems whittled down to a manageable size..."

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If you are a publishing decision-maker who wants to do the right thing by publishing or selling more titles by authors of colour, brava!! But you have to know that there is work to be done. The way the system is currently set up, writers of colour must bend and distort our work so that it is recognizable and appealing to white editors. Editors are not required to bend their reality or lens so that they can understand and relate to the styles, traditions, and aesthetics of PoC. So our work is always judged through a white lens. And the work is read and judged based on whether it will appeal to a white readership. The default assumption is that only brown folks will want to read work written by brown folks. And that white readership is the goal. This is problematic on so many levels.

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